Guiding Principle 3 – Knowledge and skills (such as planning, cooking, and preparation)

over 2 years ago
The portal is now closed for submissions. Thank you for your interest in this consultation with Health Canada about Canada’s Food Guide.

Knowledge and skills are needed to navigate the complex food environment and support healthy eating.

Health Canada is proposing the following recommendations for this Guiding Principle:

  • Selecting nutritious foods when shopping or eating out

  • Planning and preparing healthy meals and snacks

  • Sharing meals with family and friends whenever possible

What are your thoughts on this proposed Guiding Principle and its recommendations from Health Canada?

The portal is now closed for submissions. Thank you for your interest in this consultation with Health Canada about Canada’s Food Guide. 

  • Aeschylus over 2 years ago
    Hello! I know this thought is just a bit last minute, but I think it would be really important to create a system to indicate if a product contains any ingredients which are derived from animals. Avoiding animal products can be really difficult as some ingredients can be derived from animal and plant-based sources. For example, there is no way of telling if L-cysteine is come from synthetic or avian sources and this information is not always readily available from the manufacturer.However, any sort of notification that an ingredient comes from animal sources, or a product contains animal ingredients, would be incredibly helpful.
  • hartleygrover2 over 2 years ago
    I have just waded through the many opinions and downright outrageous lies attempting to shutdown the opportunity for a thoughtful discussion of the 3 sections of the proposed "Guiding Principles". I can only say "I hope that the individuals charged with preparing the final Food Guide are using science based rational for their recommendations and that their final Guide reflects Canada's need to remain a self- sufficient, food secure country supplied by our local farmers and food processors." The lack of basic nutritional knowledge is appalling. The arguments and debates mind numbing and repetitive. The entire discussion agenda has been hijacked by a singularly focused argument representing a particular point of view. Good luck to the moderator and the individuals charged with working through this consultation process ... you are going to need a lot of it!
  • sppoulos over 2 years ago
    The goal of increasing knowledge and skills to support healthy eating habits is important and should be supported. The Council fully supports this goal. Moreover, it is critical that Health Canada set the stage for upholding the findings of the collective scientific research in providing “knowledge” and avoid promoting alarmist views regarding foods based on hearsay or poorly researched hypotheses. Only this type of approach will allow for appropriate navigation of our complex food environment and improvement in healthy eating practices. As discussed earlier, the proposed advertising restrictions outlined in Health Canada’s “Toward Restricting Unhealthy Food and Beverage Marketing to Children” discussion document do not align with this Principle. Rather, the discussion document proposes approaches that are not aligned with providing knowledge and skills for Canadians to consider their individual health and nutrition needs before making good food choices. It is critical to note that it is well established that children’s preference for sweet taste is evident among infants, at birth, and children around the world. The preference for sweet-tasting foods and beverages during childhood is not solely based on food exposure or advertising and is considered basic biological ontogeny (Ventura and Mennella, 2011). Strategies to address children’s diet patterns should also consider that preferences for sweet taste decline to adult levels during middle to late adolescence (Mennella and Bobowski, 2015). It is important to consider the evidence regarding LNCS when considering public policies related to advertising of foods and beverages. As discussed above, LNCS are a safe and appropriate source of sweet taste without calories for children and adults. The Calorie Control Council also notes that, while nutrient profile models may be helpful in developing dietary patterns, they should not be used to determine specific foods that should be marketed to children. There are numerous examples of healthful foods with nutrient profiles that would suggest these foods are not ideal for regular intake. For example, fluid milk lacks dietary fibre while fruits and vegetables are often low in dietary protein and iron.The Council believes that Guiding Principle 3 must help consumers, health care professionals and researchers to focus on the collective evidence and sound science when making food choices, and finds the proposed measure on restrictive marketing of foods containing LNCS to be alarmist and detrimental to the goal of providing credible knowledge and skills to the public to help it navigate the complex food environment and promote healthy/healthier eating.
  • hg over 2 years ago
    This knowledge is definitely required however the issue is whether there will be consensus as to what exactly healthy food consists of
  • sunnyrainsworth over 2 years ago
    Addressing ways to retain satiation is important. For eg. Lemon juice can give a similar salivating taste effect to salt. Cinnamon can seem sweet. And spices can do a lot to enliven a meal with reduced fat or oils.
  • yveshomsy over 2 years ago
    Great effort that has good chances of improving the health of Canadians if adequately publicized when completed.
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    • sunnyrainsworth over 2 years ago
      Totally agree. They must be adequately publicized!
  • urmi over 2 years ago
    Selection of nutritious foods - especially unprocessed raw foods, is very important in current fast-paced lifestyle. Sharing meals will also contribute to reduced wastage of food and healthy portions.
  • sgentili over 2 years ago
    I agree the wording " whole foods" should also be incorporated in the recommendations.We as a society are eating less whole foods and more modified foods. I prefer to prepare vegetables from scratch myself but every now and again am interested to see that we can get leeks pre-cut in a bag or squash cubed. These are still whole foods processed minimally that encourages cooking despite time constraints.
  • Terry over 2 years ago
    I am not seeing the logic in the Principle being supported by the 3 recommendations. To me, the recommendations are stand-alone ideas and are not related to the Principle.The Principle needs to be discarded completely. Why would we want to scare people further away from food with the notion that they need knowledge and skills to deal with this complex matter? This seems like food industry advertising trying to convince us that food preparation is best left to the experts in restaurants.No!! Let is invite people into the wonderfully simple world of food. What could be simpler than peeling a banana or orange, or baking a potato.Food need not be complex. When we as consumers fill our carts with foods that do not have packaging, and therefore no labeling either, the better off we will be. Food preparation need not be complex either. There is delicious, multi-colored, crunchy simplicity in any tossed salad. Fruits and sprouts are best eaten raw with minimal prep other than washing or removing a peel. Many vegetables like celery, radishes, lettuce, carrots, etc. are also so simple to wash and cut. So simple.Cooking need not be complex either. Many foods are cooked with simple boiling like peas, beans, eggs, potatoes, perogies, pasta, rice, etc. Baking on a cookie sheet is so easy to prepare foods like home-cut potato fries, bannock, and baked broccoli and zucchini.Let us invite people back into their kitchens to enjoy food preparation and to pass on culinary traditions from one generation to the next.Complex food preparation like the recipe for a Black Forest Cake does not support healthy eating. Let's keep it simple. Eat food, mostly plants.
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    • sgentili over 2 years ago
      While I agree with your emphasis that cooking basic and healthy is not all that complex. YOu lost me on the the comment about the cake. There are three components to a Black Forest Cake, chocolate cake, cherries and whipping cream. Actually if you made said Black Forest Cake with a nice dark cocoa based cake and filled it with some antioxidant rich fresh or even marinated cherries and nothing hard about whisking up some whipping cream, good for your biceps if you don't use an electric beater. Not by any means complex. I agree with one thing....not to be eaten every day. Moderation is key.
  • envirovegan over 2 years ago
    many people have no idea what “nutritious foods” or “healthy” foods are. the meat and dairy and fast food industries spend billions trying to convince us their products are “nutritious” and “healthy" but the science is in. they’re not. in fact they’re killing us, in addition to being cruel and contributing to the horrors of climate change. perhaps the words “plant-based whole foods” is a better way to describe what you’re trying to encourage? for reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c5qCQDvlas or http://nutritionfacts.org
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    • sinister_cartoon_frog over 2 years ago
      >many people have no idea what “nutritious foods” or “healthy” foods are.I agree with this much. If "Selecting nutritious foods when shopping or eating out" were helpful to all Canadians as a recommendation, there would be no need to have a Food Guide. >perhaps the words “plant-based whole foods” is a better way to describe what you’re trying to encourage?I don't think this is terribly helpful either... there should be guidance about how much of different nutrients are required and what kind of foods they can be found in.
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      • mdias08 over 2 years ago
        100% agree.
      • envirovegan over 2 years ago
        according to plant based/vegan doctors, we can attain ALL essential nutrients from eating a varied whole food plant based diets. the only exception is b12 which is made by a bacteria, it's recommended that everyone (even omnivores) take a supplement for that. there are a ton of documentaries and websites if you're interested in educating yourself, it's all very interesting - "what the health" on netflix, dr gregor's http://nutritionfacts.org and best selling book "how not to die" are a good place to start. also http://sharonpalmer.com and http://www.brendadavisrd.com and http://www.thechinastudy.com and http://www.theveganrd.com etc
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        • sinister_cartoon_frog over 2 years ago
          I agree that vegetarian diets can be healthy. I just don't think "whole foods" (plant-based or otherwise) is a useful guideline to follow. It doesn't have a definite meaning and has no nutritional significance. Guidelines should be based on nutrient breakdown and/or specific types of food - advice that I can directly apply.
      • mwenmann over 2 years ago
        The more information and guidance the Government of Canada can provide, the better for sure. It is the responsibility of the government to provide the detailed information and the choice of the people to follow it. Enough of the "have in moderation" language. I would love to see concise, hard numbers and facts about required nutrient intake for optimal health outcomes.
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      Removed by moderator.
    • Terry over 2 years ago
      This language has blind-sided us. Potatoes are healthy. Chicken is healthy. Therefore, chicken nuggets and fries is a healthy meal.I think what we need to encourage is "whole foods" which I would define as recognizable as the plant they came from. Or in the case of animal derived products milk is recognized as the stuff that came out of the teat, and a pork chop is a recognizable part of the anatomy. Fresh and living foods are typically high water-content foods. True, there is little nutrient value in lettuce, but definitely eat lots of fresh greens.
  • mwenmann over 2 years ago
    Canadians need better guidance as to what "nutritious foods" really are. We have come a long way with food labelling so far but it needs to be taken a step further so people can easily recognise cholesterol, saturated fat, sodium, and simple sugars. Colour coding the labels for example, red when a food is very high in sodium, would make it easier for consumers to avoid these items. It would be great to see nutrition labels on whole foods in the produce section with fiber content, vitamins and minerals, etc. to really drive home the emphasis on selecting whole plant foods.
  • Awenmann over 2 years ago
    I also think any food that contains dietary cholesterol should have a graphic on the front similar to cigarette packages. It would achieve the goal better if it had a picture of someone getting open heart surgery with words below it saying "dietary cholesterol is linked with atherosclerosis". Or something along those lines.
  • Awenmann over 2 years ago
    I think the above recommendations are great. I would make sure that nutritious is defined as a lot of special interests will try to exploit that term. My definition of "Nutritious" is high in nutrients, low in calories. Examples of healthy food are fruits and vegetables, grains, legumes. Examples of unhealthy foods are meat and dairy (saturated fat, trans fats, no fiber, dietary cholesterol).
  • Anja over 2 years ago
    Approximately 20 years ago I became a vegetarian; I became aware how much animals suffer before they end up on the dinner plate.
  • Anja over 2 years ago
    I do appreciate the efforts of Health Canada! However, why in the Age of Information & knowledge at fingertips, we need the rely on the government to make us healthier? What about using our brain cells, intuition, experiences and knowledge? Learning from our failures?Society at large becomes increasingly like a toddler relying for mommy to clean its butt!
  • wrlindeman over 2 years ago
    People eat what they want and like or can afford. This survey is biased. Written by government paid people, researched by government people, and questions asked by government people. Govt people are paid too well and cant lose their job. The ordinary joe striving to just live has much more to worry about and cant afford the time to respond to biased surveys. You only survey the converted!!!!!!!!!!
  • JanetR over 2 years ago
    I think the current Food Guide is still valid. Consumers are educated and can make their own decisions based on it. For example if they have an intolerance they will adapt. The current Food Guide includes 4 food groups that are natural and allows consumers to choose from each. The new recommendations will be confusing integrating some food groups within others. It is too plant based. Meat and dairy and eggs are also very natural and healthy foods.
  • Joan Perrin over 2 years ago
    The critical problem to address is preventing Canadians from being overweight, now grossly overweight, and all the health problems that result. In messaging there is also an attitude in media and politics that "fat people are OK". People have lost the discipline of controlling what and the amount of what they put in their mouth. it is time to address information and 'limits' on nutritionally poor foods, snacks and beverages rather than focusing on what is bad about nutritionally rich dairy products, red meats and eggs.
  • Rawther over 2 years ago
    I agree with this guideline. I believe it can be difficult when there are 2 parents working with children to prepare all meals at home but from experience know that it can be done. When fast food options become truly healthy options, not just a salad but a varied menu with deliciously prepared bean/lentil/ tofu/ protein choices, general population health will improve. We, as a family, seek out these restaurants and enjoy them. Healthy plant based cooking classes offered at school would also be a way of preparing future generations.
  • Mona Forrest over 2 years ago
    I wish there was some way to access evidence-based information about healthy eating guidelines as applied to various chronic illnesses, such as arthritis, cancer (during and after treatment) and others. Ways to pull together meal plans for healthy eating to avoid chronic illness would be good. There is a lot of information out there and too much of it ends up being quackery, someone selling magic supplements, selling counselling or on-line courses that in themselves end up selling either prepared meals or more supplements. Maybe some regulations with sanctions for advertising unproven health supplements. A look at institutional meal preparation would be a good idea, especially hospitals and schools where people do not have much choice about what they are eating.
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    • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
      Actually, quite a bit of work has been done to address your concern. Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr. has done amazing work with those about to drop dead from heart disease, especially. Dr. John McDougall continually writes on evidence-based issues related to all the conditions you have noted. You can also find a large number of success stories on his website. Dr. Neal Barnard of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine is another huge evidence-based research person. And, of course, there is Dr. Greger of NutritionFacts.org. There is one codicil, though, to going entirely evidence-based. Many of the extreme cases - such as my husband's situation with advanced congestive heart failure - would be impossible to include in a large group-based study. You'd have to find enough individuals with parallel physical situations which would be cost prohibitive so it is unlikely to happen. If we had waited for "evidence-based" research tied entirely to cases just like his, he would have died three years ago. To get a better understanding of where the downfalls are with some aspects of the approach, read the book, "Whole" by Dr. Colin T. Campbell. At any rate, there is no need for weird supplements, meal purchases, etc.. If you follow the stricter version of plant-based eating which would be no oil, whole food, plant-based, all the chronic conditions you mention tend to go away very quickly or ameliorate dramatically. In fact, one woman who asked to meet with me after the success we had with stopping my husband from dropping dead, simply wanted to know what was really wrong with her as she had five specialists and was being sent to a sixth. I looked at her and said that her "diseases" were simply red flags raised by her body saying she could no longer tolerate the ingestion of oil and animal products and processed food. She needed to go to no oil, whole food, plant-based and her body would settle down. Within 7 months, it did. The only remaining item that flares up occasionally is fibromyalgia and that seems to be less and less. And, this is a important difference from other recommended ways of eating. When you eat no oil, whole food, plant-based, everything gets better. You don't just lose weight but later drop dead from heart disease. You don't have your cholesterol drop but later have a stroke from a blood clot that got loose. Your blood sugar doesn't just drop - your diabetes goes away. It fixes the root cause of our chronic conditions. It is amazing.
    • JulienB over 2 years ago
      Nutritionfacts.org has that information!!! https://youtu.be/rsfGpN7OKh4
    • Rickcouture over 2 years ago
      nutritionfacts.org is a great start.
  • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
    We've been no oil, whole food, plant-based for over three years because of my husband's health and it has worked to leave him disease-free and also free of medications. The night we found this way of eating and realized it was the only thing left we could try to stop him from dropping dead, I was excited by the possibilities. The next night, as I sat there contemplating our possible food choices, I found myself ticking off everything we would not be eating. Based on my rural/farm upbringing, I figured the only thing left to eat would be grass clippings! Now, I laugh at myself over those early thoughts but I understand when others are faced with a bag of lentils and wonder what they are going to do with them? The recipes I search for are ones that my plant-based network will enjoy as well as my animal-eaters. You don't just get great health outcomes, you get great tasting food. In other words, on a buffet with all sorts of choices, you would choose these foods because they really taste good. We're going to need a network of people, much like are being developed by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in the USA, to be accessible to individuals across the country, teaching others how to shop, cook, and eat this way. All of the people doing this have "walked the talk" and understand the importance of people mastering the basics. We also need to teach people that eating plant-based can be super-simple and ready in minutes or as complex and time-consuming as you could imagine. Food banks are being used as a place of instruction by some groups in the USA. This way of eating is incredibly inexpensive which is the opposite of what most people think. Churches are another natural gathering point with outreach into the community. If people begin with even one meal per week where meat is replaced by plant-based food choices, they can slowly pull together a lot of family favorites. Getting restaurants on board to offer at least one meal along this line would be great. In a town in Texas where the mayor saved himself from prostate cancer eating no oil, whole food, plant-based, a large number of restaurants now offer plant-based choices. People also will need to learn how to handle food while traveling. We took on that challenge in May for our local no oil, whole food, plant-based group when we went on a 5,000 mile car trip. It was very easy - which truly surprised me. There are now thousands of us in North America eating plant-based, especially the stricter form that removes oil and extra-high fat items for people who have reached the point of having chronic disease conditions. Reach out to the bigger plant-based community who can provide you with literally hundreds of tips, tricks, easy recipes, and the super-fancy. I've never met anyone yet who is not willing to share. Together, we can help people learn to master new approaches to food.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      I am actually one of those husbands... and yes it has worked well. after a heart attack I am able to resume all activities as before and added a few. I feel 30 years younger. I am lifting weights that I was not able to in my 20s. This is the way to go.
    • Rickcouture over 2 years ago
      I went whole foods, plant based in may 2013 and lost 20 lbs, kept it off and I eat as much as i want. Chest pains gone too...(male/43/200lbs)
  • scwmd1 over 2 years ago
    While the environmental impact of animal protein and dairy production are mentioned as part of your rational for deceasing consumption, you don't address the critical need to decrease population of humans on this planet! As we increase human life expectancy and the number of people while decreasing work opportunities by AI and robotics, cutting production of animal based protein will be insuffient. Without decreasing the population of Earth you are causing future mass starvation, conflict and misery
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    • Rickcouture over 2 years ago
      this comment is way off topic. also this thinking is dangerous.should we start allowing only the smartest to procreate? the richest? a tax on children? come on....
  • Catharine Francis over 2 years ago
    These words sound nice, but they don't have a lot of concrete meaning...What specifics will fall from these three bullet points, and what suggestions are being proposed to provide "knowledge and skills?"
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    • Terry over 2 years ago
      I agree.I think the three bullets.Let's give people some tips, one-liners, for self-talk when they are doing the grocery shopping. Most of them have been said before, "Stay on the perimeter of the store, resist going to the inner aisles."The point about shopping could be elaborated further. Shop for a variety of colors. Shop for a variety of shelf life, Shop for a variety of preparation time.
  • djbala over 2 years ago
    Responsibility should be fixed on the manufacturers, businesses, bigger corporations such as fast food restaurants, chain restaurants and ethnic restaurants. We should follow Swedish Govt. guidelines.
  • Tammy A. Hart over 2 years ago
    I believe more milk and milk products should be emphasized in the new Canada Food Guide. Milk is a natural food source with Calcium and Fat soluble vitamins. Milk is easily accessible and affordable. Children can reach for a glass of milk quicker than acquiring a handful of nuts to get their necessary daily intake of nutrients.We need some common sense and balance in my opinion.
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    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      Milk products produce an acidic state in the body and the body actually draws calcium out of the bones to buffer the acid and maintain a normal PH. Drinking milk is a major cause of obesity in our society because of the high amount of protein in cows breast milk. Because of this the end result is actually bone loss and arthritis. Read the China Study and watch Forks Over Knives and What the Health.
    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      The baby boomer generation is the first generation to experience the effects of the industrialization that occurred in the 1930's. Mass production of dairy and farm animals. What we are now seeing is that 1 in 2 will develop cancer as they age. Osteoarthritis, various cancers, osteoporosis. The earlier cohorts were more healthy because they didn't have access to the above foods as much as baby boomers have had. We eat several times a day. I know there are other factors such as smoking and drinking, but, sometimes the answer is right there in front of us and we can't see the trees for the forest.
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      • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
        same thing is happening now in China and it is happening more abruptly than with America because. Sugar consumption seen very little change since the 80s, but fats, oils, animal products have boomed and obesity and pre-diabetes is present in 50% of the population (~500,000,000 people ) and 12% is diagnosed with actual diabetes.
    • envirovegan over 2 years ago
      Removed by moderator.
    • envirovegan over 2 years ago
      there are a variety of plant based milks that are even more nutritious than dairy milk, though, and they're extremely delicious too. almond, hemp seed, cashew, soy ... these are all very kind to the bodies and to the earth. being kind to all animal bodies, including the non-human ones, seems like common sense to me.
  • Aladak over 2 years ago
    We need clear labelling on gmo products and clear labelling showing the percentage of sugar esp added sugars in all forms including cane juice or molasis etc. Cooking st home is very very important and it is also key to show that plant based foods are cheaper than traditional diets based on the main change of beans and lentils for meats and dairy
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      just buy foods that are no t labeled
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      • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
        I chuckled. Jeff Novick says that your first clue is the product comes in a box or a bag. I like his other saying about avoiding any food that has more than one ingredient on the label.
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        • Skyla over 2 years ago
          Since most GMO foods are veggies, that's pretty ridiculous.
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          • envirovegan over 2 years ago
            most gmo foods are fed to animals. if people buy certified organic veggies, they're not buying gmo. but if you eat animals, you're consuming gmos plus cholesterol plus saturated fats, plus the energy of torture and death.
  • JulienB over 2 years ago
    You should throw your support behind organisations that would not only pass your scrutiny but add incredible value to nutrition education. Say the Canadian Government recommends nutritionfacts.org for up to date information on all topics of nutrition https://youtu.be/rsfGpN7OKh4
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
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      • albert harbers over 2 years ago
        Removed by moderator.
    • Skyla over 2 years ago
      I sincerely hope the government won't be recommending propaganda websites.
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      • envirovegan over 2 years ago
        yes. science is NOT propaganda. it's science, and we all ought to have access to it. but they definitely ought to outlaw misleading and dishonest information from the meat and dairy industries, and fast food for-profit corporations.
  • verdungal over 2 years ago
    Re your recommendation to eat soy products like tofu. Please read the following link. https://www.bewell.com/blog/soy-is-not-a-health-food-6-things-to-know-about-soys-big-downside/
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      How about some evidence based science?Milk Protein vs. Soy Proteinhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1DpIB5M69oThe Role of Soy Foods in Prostate Cancer Prevention and Treatmenthttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPZk6AEP0IYDoes Soy Raise Estrogen Levels?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Bi5wbzpOHQSoy & Breast Cancerhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5iHZtlltjUBRCA Breast Cancer Genes and Soyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCFxoUKOJYUAnd really even without the studies if any of the myths perpetuated in the west about soy were true than we would see all these problems in the asian populations that eat the most soy products, but in reality it is nothing further from the truth. Asians have the least amount of Breat Cancer and Prostate Cancer (and other cancers also), they do not have reproductive problems, they do not have gynecomastia (it is the meat and milk eating countries that have those problems from all the animal estrogens in animal foods and from obesity)
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      • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
        Check out the research on this site https://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/ and in traditional Asian cultures the soy consumed was/is not GMO (which is almost impossible to find in the West) and it was/is fermented and it was/is eaten with a diet very high in fish and other seafood.
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        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          Weston Price Foundation is a quack foundation, spreading lies that even Weston Price himself did not believe in and that have NO basis in real world facts and science ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weston_A._Price_Foundation#Criticism )
        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          Weston Price nonsense has been debunked for decades, sorry http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/holisticdent.html
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          • Skyla over 2 years ago
            Anyone who thinks Quack Watch & Veg Source are credible sources might want to do a re-think.
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            • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
              they have extensive references to the facts they talk about at the bottom, what do you have ? .... References (1. Holistic dentistry. Wikipedia, accessed March 26, 2015.2. Easlick K. An evaluation of the effect of dental foci of infection on health. Journal of the American Dental Association 42:615-97, 1951.3. Grossman L. Pulpless teeth and focal infection. Journal of Endodontics 8:S18-S24, 1982.4. Founding mission statement. IABDM Web site, accessed Feb 3, 2008.5. Kall J. and others. International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT) position statement against dental mercury amalgam fillings. April 2014.for medical and dental practitioners, dental students, and patients.6. Barrett S. Commercial hair analysis: A cardinal sign of quackery. Quackwatch, April 20, 2006.7.Barrett S. Applied kinesiology: Muscle-testing for "allergies" and "nutrient deficiencies." Quackwatch, Sept 26, 2004.8. Okeson JP (editor). Orofacial Pain: Guidelines for Assessment, Diagnosis, and Management. Hanover Park, IL: Quintessance Publishing, 1996.9. Barrett S. Why craniosacral therapy is silly. Quackwatch, Sept 21, 2004.10. Hartman SE, Norton JM. Interexaminer reliability and cranial osteopathy. Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 6(1):23-34, 2002.11. Barrett S. Homeopathy: The ultimate fake. Quackwatch, Oct 4, 2007.12. Barrett S. Quack "electrodiagnostic" devices. Quackwatch, Sept 5, 2007.13. Barrett S. Bizarre tooth charts. Dental Watch, Nov 9, 2014.14. Barrett S. Auriculotherapy: A skeptical look. Acupuncture Watch, Feb 2, 2008.15. Benson JS and others. Dental Amalgam: A Scientific Review and Recommended Public Health Strategy for Research, Education and Regulation. Washington, D.C., 1993, US Public Health Service.16. Statement on amalgam. ADA Council on Scientific Affairs, Aug 2009.Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct. American Dental Association, revised 2012.17. Barrett S. The "mercury toxicity" scam: How anti-amalgamists swindle people. Quackwatch, March 2, 2006.Administrative Law Judge's conclusions about Hal A. Huggins, D.D.S (1999)., Quackwatch, Dec 23, 1999.18. Barrett S, A critical look at cavitational osteopathosis, NICO, and "biological dentistry."Quackwatch, April 4, 2010.19. First amended complaint. Ripsime (Rita) Filikyan vs. University of Texas Houston Health Science Center and others. Los Angeles Superior Court Case No. BC 355412. The case was settled out of court with a nondisclosure agreement.20. Complaint for damages. Jill Cresap vs. Alireza Panahpour, South Coast Center for New Medicine, and Leigh Erin Connealy. M.D. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2008-00114601, filed Nov 12, 2008. In 2010, shortly before the case was tried, Connealy and her clinic (where Panahpour had worked) settled for a modest undisclosed sum. At the trial, the jury ruled in Panahpour's favor.21. Complaint for damages. Anne Harrison Stone vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2008-00114750, filed Nov 14, 2008. The case was settled for an undisclosed sum.22. Complaint for damages. Andre Vaillancourt vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Los Angeles County Superior Court Case No. SC 100818, filed Dec 3, 2008. The case resulted in a judgment for $273,506. Panahpour appealed, but the Court of Appeals upheld the judgment except for $500.23. Complaint for damages. Ardis and Henry Morschladt vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-009-00323131, filed Nov 24, 2009. Panahpour agreed to settle for $19,999.98 but later asked the Court of Appeals to vacate the resultant judgment. I doubt that it will.24. Complaint for damages. Jeaneen Bauer vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2009-0329075, filed Dec 17, 2009. Panahpour was discharged when he filed for bankruptcy. The other defendants settled with nondisclosure agreements.Complaint for damages. Sarah Haynes vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2010-00344946, filed Feb 18, 2010. The case was settled with a nondisclosure agreement.25. Complaint for damages. Chelsea Bibb vs. Alireza Panahpour and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2010-00355539, filed March 22, 2010. Panahpour was discharged when he filed for bankruptcy. The other defendants settled with nondisclosure agreements.First amended complaint for damages. Pamela Mc Greevy vs. Cavitat Medical Technologies, Alireza Panahpour, and others. Orange County Superior Court Case No. 30-2010-00368271, filed Nov 3, 2010. The case was settled with a nondisclosure agreement.
            • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
              they have extensive references to the facts they talk about at the bottom of the page ... what do you have to disprove it ?
        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
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          • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
            Sorry Eugen, I disagree with you...I have my own experience and research to rely on...you must be careful about what you see on the internet these days!
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            • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
              Removed by moderator.
    • envirovegan over 2 years ago
      the soy myth is dangerous and untrue, and leads me to wonder who is perpetuating it and why. if people eat animals, they're eating processed gmo soy that's fed to those animals. if people eat organic non-gmo soy directly, they're getting essential nutrients. if you eat nothing but soy for days on end, yeah, you're going to get some bad effects. but nobody does that. and, estrogen is a good addition to a mature woman's diet, my herbalist even recommended it when i was going through the life change. for more information: https://youtu.be/ar-tEMIWLFE
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      • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
        and is any of the myths about soy were true we would see it in the populations that ate soy for thousands of years and that eat the most soy ... and guess what, prostate cancer is the lowest in asians, breast cancer is the lowest in asians, asian females have 50% less circulating estrogen than western women (this is from the china study, before the westernization of China, I bet it is going up now) and soy eating asian men do not get man-boobs ... all the things people scare-monger about soy are true in the western diet, not the asian one.
  • Shirley39 over 2 years ago
    I have a problem with the layout of the guide.On the first page you have four categories-Vegetables/Fruit, Grain Products, Milk and Alternatives and Meat and Alternatives.I would like to see those four headings carries to the next page where you talk about food servings. On the next page you have comments on the four catagories. I would like to see those comments under each of the four areas where you have the pictures of servings.This way if I were to look at grain Products, for example, I would have everything together on grain and would not have to search through the complete document to see if I missed any information on grain Products.On the page "Make each Food Guide Serving count..." there is an asterisk after the line"Eat at least two Food Guide Servings of fish each week*Could not find what the asterisk was referring to.
  • Skyla over 2 years ago
    I would like to request the moderator(s) remove all of the virtually identical copy/paste comments from the discussion for all 3 principles. They are obviously from people who were sent here to attempt to unduly influence this consultation with prepared comments. Individuals don't normally come up with exactly the same comment all on their own.
  • Laura Comparey over 2 years ago
    I am hopeful that a revised and updated National Food guide will improve the quality of food served in hospitals , retirement homes, schools and other public institutions, because at the moment they leave a lot to be desired.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      I completely agree. Maybe they become more tasty as well
    • Skyla over 2 years ago
      So very true. When my husband was in hospital a few years ago, his supper one night was literally 3 meatballs and a tater. Even when he got an actual real meal (very rare, they nearly starved him to death with constant NPO) it was usually terrible.
  • Aladak over 2 years ago
    We should also treach kids how to read labels in school and teach them basic abilities to grow plants that can be eaten
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      as parents that would be our job
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      • Filiatrault_t over 2 years ago
        Education in school about healthy eating comes from the Provincial Government and curriculum. As an educator in elementary school in BC, Canada, I know it is so important! We do have to teach them about factors that influence food choices and healthy eating. Every month the kids get a fruit or veg snack (unpackaged) as a part of the BC School Fruit and Vegetable Nutritional Program. Not all kids get this education at home... in perfect world parents would teach their kids how to eat healthily, and schools would have the resources to teach kids about healthy food and tools so they can practice preparation and make healthy meals at school.
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        • hoochiemama over 2 years ago
          As a support staff in Quebec public elementary schools, I've always been uncomfortable with the past Canada Food Guides taught to students, especially the "dairy" section... so glad the emphasis on meat and milk will be removed, or at least lessened, in this newer version!
      • Skyla over 2 years ago
        And what about parents who don't have any idea? Their kids are just supposed to...what, pick it up by osmosis somehow? Or we leave them with no information?
  • hortense over 2 years ago
    Making food from scratch again is important today when we often don't know what is in prepared foods and what the effect is on us. I have no interest in labouring over a stove all day but I put aside a morning a week to prepare fruitarian (one step beyond vegan) food for the week. With that done, meals take a few minutes to prepare. I eat a lot raw. Snacks for me are dried fruit, raisins, figs or seeds. It bothers me that a lot of people can't afford this. We all must work to include everyone in a healthy diet. It might mean giving up that cursed smart phone. Do we have smart phones and stupid people? With the money saved (start using your own brain again instead of a machine!) you can afford fresh fruit. Live simply, a Good life. Creator bless. Hortense
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    • Skyla over 2 years ago
      Do you not understand that a)a smart phone is a one time purchase, that would be less than 1 month's worth of groceries for an average family and b) many poor people already *don't* have smart phones, or cell phones at all, and still can't afford to eat more nutritious foods? Yes, everyone, sell your smart phones, who cares if you need them in order to get/keep work, so you can buy healthy food for an entire month. That will totally be helpful.
  • heiferlady over 2 years ago
    Selecting nutritious foods when shopping or eating out- sounds good, but what does it mean?If it s a skill- who is teaching it? Shopping, meal preparation, healthy eating take time and some knowledge of what is a portion size, what is a good value purchase, cost per serving if on a budget.Add a concern such as diabetes (my family's concern is celiac disease) and more foods have to be eliminated or substituted. The problems of two parents working, this may not allow adequate time to do both shopping and preparation.Life-long healthy eating starts in childhood IMO, and kids who will eat a wide variety of healthy foods (without complaint) should be congratulated!!!!
  • Olga Szczepanska over 2 years ago
    Agree
  • Gregor over 2 years ago
    Some consideration should be made for Canadians on limited budgets or who have never been taught how to cook. Nutritious foods could be listed, along with those that are affordable. It's no coincidence that fast food companies locate in poor areas of our country, and the same areas have high diabetes and obesity rates. "Sharing meals" is a strange terminology and needs to be clarified for purpose.
  • hortense over 2 years ago
    We would like to ask that the pesticides on our produce be identified at point of purchase and if they are genetically modified it be revealed at the store. You are telling me knowledge and skill are needed selecting food, especially when so much we need to know is hidden from us.
  • hortense over 2 years ago
    Sharing a simple, wholesome, healthy, morally sound (vegan or fruitarian) meal with loved ones is great. There is a danger in confusing the food with the love, though. It becomes like a fetish, to use a psychiatric term. Without trying to be too pure, we must recognize that food is meant to nourish our bodies. The feeling of well-being we get sometimes is our bodies way of encouraging us to eat something that was once hard to come by (salt, fat) or rewarding us for eating nutritiously. Let's not confuse that with love. Women especially do not want to be encumbered with complicated involved meals. Usually the more complicated a dish, the less healthy. As much raw as possible. If you feel like your meal together was unsatisfying because the meal was so simple (some fruit, a salad, some brote or beans or quinoa a variety of that) well that is a sign you are not getting ( and shouldn't be looking for) emotional satisfaction from eating, which is a good thing. Get accustomed to it and converse instead.
  • nancy chapman over 2 years ago
    Two other important elements are access to healthy, affordable foods and adequate food budget. It is also useful to have community kitchens where joint preparation of meals can take place, especially for those who have limited food storage and preparation places in their homes.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      to make healthy foods more affordable and unhealthy foods less affordable all the government has to do is take away or at least lower the subsides the animal farms get from the tax dollars and stop bailouts of these industries. Why Canadian Dairy Won a Massive Subsidy Despite Falling Demand ( http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/yan-roberts/canadian-dairy-tpp_b_8253432.html ) Taxpayers oblivious to the cost of farm subsidies ( https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/taxpayers-oblivious-to-the-cost-of-farm-subsidies/article13055078/ )
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      • morgandunn over 2 years ago
        I must say that I have to agree with you on this. The government CAN do better on this. Rather than supporting CAFO's and conventional farming, money should be given to supporting more local farmers who have gone back to farming the way we used to pre-war where farms wasted less and were far less toxic.
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        • IcyMint over 2 years ago
          The government should also consider the way it supports big junk food companies and work on supporting produce rather than processed foods.
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          • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
            also take away the unfair subsides for animal industries that make meat, milk and eggs cheap and healthy foods like plants become artificially impractical to buy when you have cheap animal products (all over the world where governments don't subsidies animal industries people eat primarily plants because they are a lot cheaper than meat)
        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          unfortunately factory farms are a lot more economical and environmentally friendly than traditional farms (they utilize resources more efficiently, the feeding is cheaper and overall operation has a smaller environmental and pollution footprint than traditional farming) ... farming plants is the only sustainable solution for our planet, animal farming is the most wasteful way to get nutrients (10-100x more resources than plants)
  • hoochiemama over 2 years ago
    Eating at home, or eating food prepared at home, is the ONLY way to avoid nasty elements such as GMOs, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, sugar, MSG, etc. Restaurants don't buy organic, as a rule, and should therefore be avoided. As for shopping, as long as Canada refuses to label GMO produce and food products I will continue to spend the extra bucks on that which is labelled "100% organic". In the "planning and preparing" of healthy meals and snacks it's important to address the issue of food wastage, which is huge problem. One has only to take a look at people's shopping carts to see that, though they may have good eating intentions, it will be a challenge to eat all that produce without some of it going "bad". What is the point of purchasing nutritious food if half of it goes in the garbage? Not to mention that rotting food produces stunning amounts of methane, an extremely potent GHG, if not composted. As a "climatarian", I very much support the link the the CFG is helping Canadians make between their food choices and the resulting impact on our environment and the climate crisis.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      you can buy wild caught animals that ate non-GMO foods and still have higher levels of pesticides and pollutants in their fat than the plants that are directly sprayed with pesticides because of the fat content of animals and animal derived foods, they are a sponge for toxins and pollutants. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioaccumulation
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      • morgandunn over 2 years ago
        Better yet, if we don't use pesticides and toxins then the animals don't have that problem either. The same can be said for us who don't eat GMO just by being surrounded by the toxins we are and pesticide use.
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        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          The water and soil if so saturated in most countries that even organic animal products are contaminated with GMO pesticides, industrial pollutants, medical drugs that the only way to stay away from them is to not eat animals because their fat is a sponge to all the nasty chemicals, plants don't have the issue even if they are sprayed with the toxic chemicals they run out of the plant easier than the accidental accumulation in animal fat. This USDA & FDA report make that clear ( http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/12-commonly-contaminated-foods ) NOT one single plant had more pesticides than MEAT and MILK.
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          • Nan over 2 years ago
            Agree to a point but as people are learning about the causes of so much 'ill-health' in the world, there are (and the numbers are growing exponentially) more individuals, consumers, some Corporations, Governments, Nations and Countries that are doing lots to innovatively populate healthy practices and operate beyond the almighty dollar driven 'big-everything'. All is not lost and it is proven time and again 'a nation can be moved by the positive power of it's people"
      • hoochiemama over 2 years ago
        Agreed. Sorry I forgot to specify that I eat a plant-based diet and was referring to fresh produce.
      • nickarrizza over 2 years ago
        Removed by moderator.
    • OrganicBrainHealth over 2 years ago
      Freeze before it goes totally bad and make a vegetable broth with it. Drink the broth, use in soups and to sautee your vegetables that have not gone bad. Hope this helps you and others.
  • nickarrizza over 2 years ago
    An exhaustive review of why a vegan diet (based on a whole plant based diet consisting of starchy and non starchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, limited amounts of nuts/seeds, Vitamin B12 supplementation), daily sunshine exposure, regular exercise, the elimination of all animal protein/fat sources, AND the elimination of ALL processed oils and refined foods is available in Jan Deckers 2016 review: Animal (De)liberation: Should the Consumption of Animal Products Be Banned? (Might a Vegan Diet Be Healthy, or Even Healthier?) available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK396513/Dr John Mcdougall (The Starch Solution and The Healthiest Diet On The Planet and 12 other books) has a Quick Start Program on his site www.drmcdougall.com and Dr Neal Barnard (The Power of Foods for the Brain, The Cheese Trap and almost 20 other books) also has his similar version The 21 Day Kick Start program http://www.pcrm.org/kickstartHome that provide a weekly whole plant based food plan with recipes and instructions that a 5 year old can follow.
  • galewills over 2 years ago
    This guideline makes sense for most folks who live independently in the community. What about those of us who live in an institution and have little or no way to control what is offered in our dining rooms. I live in an "independent" seniors' residence where healthy eating reflects ideas that were extant in the mid-twentieth century. Please keep in mind the needs of seniors (and others) whose living circumstances rely on someone else following Canada's Food Guide when making up their menus. And please keep in mind that the old "meat-potato-vegetable" routine is out of date, culturally and ethnically irrelevant for many, and should be discarded.
  • Ashleigh SUllivan over 2 years ago
    Isn't this too vague to be meaningful to anyone? It's like saying "eat healthy" but people are consulting the food guide to be told what is healthy.
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    • homecook over 2 years ago
      As far as a guiding principle, I think it's sufficient and short enough to get the message across. What I think we need is further discussion (elsewhere in the food guide) on how to achieve this goal - a list of available resources, things to look for on food labels (if buying food with labels), healthy food options, and especially targeting people on restricted diets - people who are already very limited in their choices of foods due to health or other issues. People with restricted diets already have to do a lot more work to find a good selection and variety of foods - something to help make the healthy-choice easier would be greatly appreciated.
    • cprevost over 2 years ago
      I'm finding the format in general of this new guide to be like that. It's all good base information and in my opinion the right concepts to be following, but it's lacks information.
  • rchavoshi over 2 years ago
    Agree.
  • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
    I agree wholeheartedly with some of these recommendations, but disagree on several. As a nutritionist and one who spends many hours researching the latest new information coming out (and taking into consideration who funded said research and whether or not they could be benefitting financially from the results), there are a few untrue premises here, IMO. First of all we are all unique and therefore our optimal diet is unique and, in fact, what is optimal for any one individual can change throughout the seasons, and even through the aging process. In general, the more processing, the least healthy for anyone, though....the closest to natural, and free of toxins, artificial additives, etc. the better. Also, one fairly recent theory is that it depends a lot where on the earth you live what is best for you. People living near the equator do better on more carbs/plant based diets, in general, while people in the higher latitudes (like Canada) generally do better health wise with more animal protein and animal fat (saturated). Some of the more recent research refutes the previously widely touted research (funded by industry that stood to gain by people eating more unsaturated oils) that saturated fats are bad for us....not true...we need saturated fats, (from healthy sources, mind you, such as grass fed on herbicide/pesticide/toxin free grass and from animals, that have led natural healthy lives vs. farm factory animals), for our body's hormone production, all cell membranes, and brain cells. Also, there is definitely conflicting information about which is better for our environment too...newer info is demonstrating that properly managed herd animals are beneficial to the environment http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/01/12/grazing-cows-biological-farming.aspx# ! For thousands of years our indigenous people have thrived on a diet high in animal protein and fat (including seafood)....that should tell you which theories might be closer to correct. There should also be recommendations for the quality/purity of the food and water in our diets, the less herbicides, pesticides, additives, toxins, GMOs, etc. the better, stressing buying locally when possible.Totally agree on minimal processed food and encouraging people to do as much as possible of their own planning, cooking, and preparing of their own food. If we get this right, and stress education of the public, we would all improve our health and the cost of health care in our country.
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    • janinas over 2 years ago
      Unfortunately, we have become extreme in the amount of meat we eat in North American and study after study demonstrates that it is making us (along with other extreme dietary issues such as the amount of sugar in our diet) very sick. As well the meat we eat in our society is very very different than the meat that has been consumed by Indigenous peoples for centuries. And our lifestyle is also very different, too - ie sedentary. I agree that we also need recommendations for the quality / purity of food and water - the herbicides, pesticides etc. It would be great to add these ideas to the recommendations.
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      • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
        I totally agree that conventional factory farm meat is not a healthy food! That is another point that could be stressed in these recommendations. But sustainably and humanely raised animals that are fed what nature intended are in my opinion very beneficial for most people that live in the upper latitudes. Raising meat this way does cost more and so it is not as likely to be eaten to excess like the cheaply produced poor quality meat that our factory farms vs. family farms are producing.
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        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          There is no significant difference between organic and non-organic meats and animal products because the components and mechanisms that cause disease are inherent in animal products (fats, cholesterol, heme-iron, protein, byproducts from cooking ... etc). There is a reason why the longest living and healthiest populations on Earth have one thing in common in their diet ... LOW meat or better yet NO MEAT (www.BlueZones.com).
    • Nicholestephen over 2 years ago
      I'm not so sure why anyone would disagree with your comment, unless they just aren't knowledgeable. But I agree with you, Lori Curran, 100%. I've been studying nutrition myself lately so I know exactly where you're coming from.
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      • GoodFoodHeals over 2 years ago
        There are millions of people worldwide who live a perfectly healthy life without meat. When Loris says, "For thousands of years our indigenous people have thrived on a diet high in animal protein and fat (including seafood)," she is referring to a people (e.g., Inuit) specially evolved to eat a high-protein diet because they had no other food source. Most Westerners' ancestors come from countries where a high-(animal) protein diet is detrimental to health and the evidence of our continued ignorance is everywhere.
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        • LWong over 2 years ago
          Latest research shows that the Inuit diet, high in saturated fat from animals, leads to cardiovascular disease.
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          • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
            I definitely disagree...the latest non industry funded research shows that saturated fats are not the bad guys that we have been led to believe http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20140320/dietary-fats-q-a#1 http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/09/22/7-reasons-to-eat-more-saturated-fat.aspxBut I only believe that animal proteins and fats from animals raised as they would live naturally and only fed food that is natural to them are healthy meats and fats to eat, as when there are toxins from herbicides, and pesticides on their food and in their environment or antibiotics and added hormones in the animals, it is not at all the same. And what Dr. Weston A. Price found in his world wide research on traditional cultures, was that there was no heart disease, tooth disease, etc. in the Inuit eating their traditional foods...it wasn't until the started consuming processed foods, that their health started to decline.
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            • LWong over 2 years ago
              There are other researchers who find differing results regarding the healthiness of traditional diets including the Inuit one. Fodor GJ, Helis E, Yazdekhasti N, Vohnout B, “Fishing” for the origins of the“Eskimos and heart disease” story. Facts or wishful thinking? A review, Canadian Journal of Cardiology(2014), doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2014.04.007.
        • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
          I am not only referring to the Inuit and other North American Indigenous peoples, but also other people of the higher latitudes such as Scandinavia, Northern Russia, and also the more northern areas of Europe, and yes that is correct the people that lived in these regions evolved to eat this way because that was what was available to them and also gave them good health for where they lived. I do believe that people who live closer to the equator do better on a more carbohydrate/plant based diet, but I see many people here in Canada that do not do well long term without animal protein and fat (and I do mean from healthy sources, only...not factory farmed). As a nutritionist, I have seen numerous cases where people do well on a vegan diet for a time, but after a couple years their health has declined and then it improves again with animal protein and fats are added back in. Weston A. Price researched traditional cultures and their diets and their health all over the world and his work is published for anyone that wants to research what he found.
        • Nicholestephen over 2 years ago
          The correlation between chronic diseases and the western diet isn't the result of high protein consumption, it's due mainly to high fats, sugars, and salt intake in which most meat eaters also consume due to highly processed foods. If you pay close attention to the scientific studies, this is exactly what they tell us.
      • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
        Removed by moderator.
    • Honeybeemkg over 2 years ago
      Well said.
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      We are not unique, we all have the same physiology and anatomy and even share it with our primate ancestors. There are many theories on diets and how they are different depending on blood type and body type and what not, but there is NO scientific evidence to back that up and has been disproven times and times again. Blood Type Diet Debunked. People do NOT do better with higher amounts of fat and that has been proven on Inuits following low fat diets and having lower incidence of diabetes, obesity, cancer and atherosclerosis. The Inuit myth about health is just that .... a MYTH http://nutritionstudies.org/masai-and-inuit-high-protein-diets-a-closer-look/ New Study Explodes the ‘Eskimo Myth’http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neal-barnard-md/eskimo-myth_b_5268420.htmlFish oil and the 'Eskimo diet': another medical myth debunkedhttps://www.minnpost.com/second-opinion/2014/08/fish-oil-and-eskimo-diet-another-medical-myth-debunked
  • Shevtsov over 2 years ago
    I am very happy by the demotion of dairy from the food guide. I wish we could eliminate it completely! But I totally agree with including the above recommendations within the new food guidelines. Thank you!
  • Scorey over 2 years ago
    With such a disconnect between where food comes from and the people consuming food, I strongly encourage the new food guide to stress the importance of food education by providing reliable sources of information about all aspects of food production. Encourage people to talk directly to those growing their food and maybe provide information about local farmers' markets and producers. With so much misinformation circulating, I think it is important for consumers to talk directly to the people growing their food and those who know more about it than anyone else.
  • lindah99999h over 2 years ago
    Please note that although whole food plant based diets with no added oil are low fat diets, this is not the type of low fat diets that were used in studies showing that low fat diets are unhealthy. The unhealthy low fat diets have added oils. Be careful when you read letters from medical practitioners who state all low fat diets are unhealthy. Whole food plant based diets with no added oil are the only diets that have been scientifically proven to prevenr AND reverse heart disease.
  • lindah99999h over 2 years ago
    A whole food plant based diet no added oil should be the regular food guide. All other guides should be alternative guides. In all guides, plant protein should be the main protein, meat dairy sources should be the alternate proteins and should come with a warning that they increase risk of major diseases (cancer, diabetes, heart disease). Dairy, eggs, meat should all be in the same category as milk is just liquid meat.
  • cbanman over 2 years ago
    I completely agree with including the above recommendations within the new food guidelines. I'd like to see cooking information included for plant based proteins. Legumes are a great budget friendly way keep protein in your diet, especially with the rising cost of meat. However, many people may not be used to cooking them so recipe ideas would also be a great addition. It would also be great to include a list of seasonal veggies and fruits / province and recommend buying local produce when you can. It would also be great to include price comparisons & nutrition comparisons between plant based meals & typical American diet & eating out.
  • Cb over 2 years ago
    These revisions to the canada food guide are excellent and long overdue. I have been noticing that the United States is closely watching how this new guide is progressing. If the new food guide comes into effect, Canada will not only be helping Canadians, but will be a leader on the world stage. Fight the large companies that will try and block this!!! This new eating guideline is so badly needed. Good luck and don't give up!!
  • ratkins over 2 years ago
    I support the recommended revisions to Canada’s Food Guide that emphasize eating fresh whole foods and limiting or eliminating meat, egg, and dairy products, as these products have been linked to disease epidemics and environmental destruction. Numerous studies have proved the benefits of reducing or eliminating red meat, chicken, fish, dairy, and eggs from our diets. Plant-based diets can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases, help reduce our carbon footprints, and save precious resources such as fresh water and fossil fuel. Specifically, plant-focused diets have been shown to do the following:Limit Cancer RiskReduce Heart DiseaseFight DiabetesCurb ObesityIncrease LongevityReduce Our Carbon FootprintMinimize Water UsageReduce Fossil Fuel DependenceThe government is obligated to act in the best interests of Canadian citizens. Accordingly, I encourage the Canadian government to act responsibly and ethically by ensuring that Canada’s Food Guide recommendations strongly focus on plant-based foods. Thank you.
  • OliviaJ over 2 years ago
    Whenever I shop in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, which is where we go for groceries, I end up shocked by the choices people make to fill their carts. If there is a sale on bottled water, for example, the cart is filled, the water is packed in plastic bags and then wheeled out of the store. I often imagine these people must have cabins where water is needed. Why buy it all in these little bottles? Well, what do I know?There is so much non-nutritious food piled up in pyramids near the entrance that is loudly advertised ON SALE. It's depressing. We often have to identify veg to the check-out staff who wonder, 'What is this?' Delicious we say.
  • verdungal over 2 years ago
    An excellent post on FB from lCarol Loffelmann ."I am happy to report that Carol Loffelmann and I, on behalf of a group of 717 physicians and allied health providers, have resubmitted our final version of the open letter regarding the dietary guidelines (with many more signatures than the original 190). We have also written a rebuttal letter to their initial proposed changes. Health Canada is going to be making significant positive changes to the food guide, but there are a few important issues that still do not reflect the evidence. The rebuttal letter can be viewed here (https://drive.google.com/…/0B8jdVsC8-uKEZXJIamZ4TUIwO…/view…), but both the revised open letter and the rebuttal letter can be found at www.changethefoodguide.ca.
  • Stephanie over 2 years ago
    We all need to think about what we are eating and we can make a difference not only to our bodies by eating more healthy meals but eating less meat will PERHAPS curtail the horrific factory farming of animals. These animals live in terror their whole lives and are mistreated and the stress hormones they emit are in our meat and we ingest them. Not to mention all the crap they shove into animals. A few months ago a truck containing RED SKITTLES that was going to factory farming for COWS to EAT (!!!!) tipped over on the highway spilling it's load. SKITTLES FOR OUR ANIMALS? WHAT ELSE ARE THEY FEEDING THESE ANIMALS. No wonder we are seeing so may mental health issues in young children and teens. Nutrition has disappeared. Need to get it back.
  • Jjp_44 over 2 years ago
    "Choose local, organic, alkaline-forming, non-processed, non-genetically modified whole foods, particularly herbs, vegetables, sea vegetables, wild-crafted foods, leafy greens and small proportions of local fruits in season. Select non-inflammatory foods, prepare mindfully and lovingly and consciously". Chew slowly and consciously to maximize nutrition and digestibility. Learn about local foraging of wild foods and what can be grown in your neighborhood to reduce greenhouse gases and ecological footprint.
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    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      Absolutely great advice! Eloquently said!
  • andrejolicoeur over 2 years ago
    Plant based protein sources are incomplete in isolation, so getting complete protein requirements from non-meat products can be complex at first, but it becomes easier with practice and teaching about protein source pairings should be a fundamental part of the new recommendations. For example, rice and beans are incomplete in isolation, but together provide a complete protein profile. As with most things related to food and health eating a diet with lots of variety is key to ensuring you get enough of all the nutrients you need.
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    • LWong over 2 years ago
      Actually latest research has debunked the idea of having to pair foods for "complete protein requirements". As long as you get a variety of plant based proteins throughout the day you don't need to pair them up.
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      • andrejolicoeur over 2 years ago
        When I refer to 'complete protein requirements', I mean getting sufficient protein with a complete amino acid profile. There are many plant based protein sources that offer the complete profile of all 9 essential amino acids (ie, quinoa, chia, soy), but many offer only trace amounts of one or another. For example, beans are low in methionine and high in lysine, while rice is low in lysine and high in methionine, which is why they are a good 'pairing'. This is more of a concern in areas of the world where the majority of the diet comes from a single crop and lacks variety. But you're completely right, in Canada we are privileged to have access to a vast array of plant based protein sources and as long as we're enjoying a good variety of foods most people should have nothing to worry about :)
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        • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
          LWong was correct above. The previous thoughts on "getting sufficient protein with a complete amino acid profile" has been debunked. Even the person who is associated with that recommendation has come out against it. Eat the plant-based foods and all will be well. People do not have to worry about complicated combinations.
  • hortense over 2 years ago
    Exactly what kind of pesticides being used on produce must be revealed at point of purchase. Whether or not the produce is GMO must be revealed. How far away from the point of purchase the produce was grown must be noted. You talk a fine talk about helping people make decisions in this so called "complex food environment". We want the information we need to make those decisions, including the truth about meat, dairy and eggs (addictive, carcinogenic, abusive, animal agriculture causes 51% of climate change). We waste tons of food because we know it is garbage food and we don't respect it. "Knowledge and skill" have nothing on a simpler principle: Telling the Truth.
  • RBruceSargent over 2 years ago
    I am very disappointed by the demotion of dairy from the food guide. The press surrounding this change has been overwhelming been controlled by vegans claiming farmers abuse their animals. The influence of vegans on our government is sad to see. Especially when we have research showing children fed almond milk instead of cows milk are deprived of vital nutrients. Milk is a food stable for good reason. The many nutrients available in milk cannot simply be replace by a plant based diet. Articles about this food guide also insinuate Health Canada should inform people that animal products are bad for the enviroment. When will Health Canada stop pushing the agenda of vegan activists.
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    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      One must be careful where they get their information from. One has to learn how to eat a whole food plant based diet properly. Diets vary quite significantly. Children should be breast fed by their own species. Not a species that is meant to make a 60 pound calf into 400 pounds in 6 months. And we are only meant to breast up to a certain age. Humans are the only species on the planet takes breast milk from another species and uses it for food. Not talking about carnivores here. Humans have the digestive anatomy of a herbivore. Totally disagree with what you are saying.
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      • rcross over 2 years ago
        humans also take a tiny seed from a grain and make noodles. And fly around in planes while texting about noodles. Dairy has powerful nutrition and our family enjoys both the taste and nutrition from milk cheese and yogurt. I don't buy the argument that humans aren't adapted to eat milk. Why are we able to digest lactose past infancy?
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        • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
          Dairy has casein in it. See T. Colin Campbell, The China Study. Rats given diets rich in casein got cancer. Why is it that 1 in 2 will get cancer now. What are we doing as a species that might be wrong? Also animal based proteins make the body acidic and the body actually draws calcium out of bones to buffer the acid. So promoting that milk does a body good, might not be so correct after all. But you can believe what you want. It takes years for a diet to produce effects in humans. What you can't see going on can hurt you. I looked at the dairy lovers in my own extended family and they are all really short in old age and the ones that ate meat and lots of dairy got cancer. My aging vegetarian relatives are fairing way better. It was interesting for me when I studied diet and compared them to various family members and the health diseases they developed which lead me to believe The China Study. So I adopted a plant based protein diet and wow did I feel a difference.
        • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
          And whats also interesting is that after 20 years working in ICU and ER as a nurse and looking at the diets of my patients I rarely treated a vegetarian and vegan. All the patients that have osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, cancer and heart problems all eat meat and dairy. And whats really interesting is that I have never treated a vegan in hospital for the above. In fact I have never treated a vegan period for the above diseases.
        • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
          In fact I have never seen a vegan in our ICU/CCU department. When I ask about diet preferences so that we can enter their diets in the computer not one of my patients' ever said they were vegan. All my patients eat meat and dairy. Vegans don't seem to be visiting our department for treatment. After 20 years you would think I would have come across one vegan with cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and arthritic diseases, BUT I HAVEN'T! Truly.
    • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
      I come from a rural farm background and my grandfather had a dairy. I know this is hard to grasp - at least it was for me - but dairy consumption is causing a massive amount of disease in people and killing others. My husband was nearly one of those three years ago. I watched him struggling to breathe and walk as he was launched into the world of advanced congestive heart failure abruptly. I spent seven weeks watching him die a bit more each day. Not once, despite all the research I was doing to try and understand how this happened, did I ever suspect animal products - not once. When answers ran out, when there was no hope as he would not live long enough to get the heart transplant, I discovered the world of Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr. of the Cleveland Medical Clinic. His message was simple. Get rid of all animal products and oil and my husband would get better. WHAT???!!!! It sounded crazy but we had nothing to lose. Within 7 days, his symptoms began to abate. Within weeks, he was free of medications. Now, three years later, he is alive, well, without symptoms, and without any medications. We will never forget the emotional torture of those weeks when medicine ran out of answers. These guidelines are not about vegans. These guidelines are about cutting billions and billions of dollars from health costs because they will prevent people from becoming seriously ill. We got our second chance but 1 in 4 won't find out they aren't doing so well until they hit the autopsy table. Yes, we all know someone who ate bacon, smoked cigarettes, and drank milkshakes every day before dropping dead at 90. They had very special DNA. The other 99.9% of the population does not have that luck. Think about yourself. Do you have high blood pressure? Do you have high cholesterol? Is someone in your family suffering from rheumatoid arthritis? Multiple sclerosis? Diabetes? Lupus? Kidney disease? What I've learned over the last three years is that all of these can be halted if you get rid of the oil and animal products. Most can be reversed. Consider this for your own situation. What we truly do not understand is that the medications doctors provide might SLOW the rate of disease progression but they do not stop it nor reverse it. Plants do that. As for the children, they need the milk from their own species (human) when they are starting out but they do not need the milk from another animal species. Mother Nature has cleverly designed plants to have everything that is needed for excellent growth. I truly understand your perspective. Three years ago I shared it. You know what? I was wrong then. None of this is about some political agenda. This is about health. This is about preventing disease. This is about saving more money on unnecessary health costs than we can imagine. Is this move going to be hard on the dairy industry? In time to come, yes. Do they need to make preparations. Yes. Tobacco farmers in the USA went through this twenty years ago. However, this also opens up immense opportunities in other areas of agriculture. We haven't even begun to consider the impact of these changes there. I know it is hard to believe but this really is necessary. And, I was serious when I said that if you have any of the conditions I mentioned - even at the earliest stages - please consider going plant-based, too. All of the major doctors leading the plant-based movement have come from farm backgrounds. They can relate to your concerns. Unfortunately, it does not change the facts.
    • nzouri over 2 years ago
      Harward School of Public Health says that dairy may not be as healthy as you think: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium-full-story/#slowing-osteo That is why they developed their own food guide which recommends to limit dairy: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate/ . If you feed anybody enough food (children included) they will not be deprived of anything. There are many examples of malnourished children raised by non-vegan parents, including the ones feeding their kids dairy.
  • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
    I've thought about the knowledge and skills piece extensively as I lead an informal group who have removed all oil and all animal products and who focus on consuming whole foods as much as possible. The group started because I had shared what we had done to reverse end-stage congestive heart failure for my husband based on following the work of Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr. and others wanted to get rid of their own health issues, improve their health, and prevent the near-disaster we faced three years ago. People asked that I pull people together to learn from each other. In the virtual Facebook world, we have around 71 in the group. Face-to-face, we probably have 15 to 25 who come every month or so to share food which allows them to taste recipes and expand their own repertoire. We have people who work two jobs; others who are on their own; some who hate to cook; and others who are quite adept in the kitchen. We have every age represented and both genders. Everyone faces issues eating out. We also have everyone from those who are just transitioning to those who are well along the path when it comes to eating no oil, plant-based. Tastebuds can be quite different along that path. One of the issues we try to address each month is a food/recipe that can be made in minutes. One of the most useful resources I purchased were 3 DVD's from Jeff Novick, a long-time, plant-based dietician who talked about plant-based "fast food." That concept boggled my mind in the first few days. Apart from salad, how could you make a hot meal in minutes? Well, he does. His techniques are simple and are ideal for people on the run. I continue to lend these out as it gives people a way to "think" about how they can cook this way without being in the kitchen all day. In fact, the DVD's arrived in my house just before I went to get new groceries for the very first time that aligned with Esselstyn's guidelines. I shoved the first one in the series in the machine and my husband and I watched it before I went out the door. I could feel my stress level dropping dramatically. "We can do this!!" Yes, that was my attitude after watching the DVD. It really was no big deal. His whole theme was prepping food in roughly 10 minutes. Now, that is fast. Some members of our group are becoming quite adept at coming up with their own fast food. Pitas made without oil turn into pizza crusts. Oil-free tomato sauce or Costco's organic tomato paste work well as a base and then the veggies pile on top before heading for the oven. I make my own partially baked crusts that go in the oven but this works for them. In fact, trying to find oil-free bread can take longer than one can imagine. I taught our group the "Breadin5.com" technique. You toss all the dry ingredients in a big bowl/bucket, add in the liquids, mix, and then leave to rise for a couple of hours or put it in the fridge and use it anytime over the next 10 days. There is NO kneading necessary. (Children could make this.) Some of their recipes have oil but we substitute water or vegetable broth or apple sauce, etc. depending on whether it is a regular bread or savoury or sweet. It takes so little time to make bread this way that chasing all over seems ridiculous. Their recipe never fails. I cannot understand why I never learned how to do this decades ago. At any rate, you can find their YouTube videos or go to their site and watch. There is no charge. The strange part is that I trained as a plant-based chef a couple of years ago but the longer we eat this way, the more inclined we are to prefer simple foods. It might be plain rice and beans with tomatoes. The other night, we heated corn tortillas, added steamed kale, thinly sliced cooked mushrooms that had a few sprinkles of Liquid Smoke, some warmed-up slivers of peppers, and a few beans. Another night, I tossed a pound of brown rice in the microwave in a large, bowl with plenty of water added and also put in a big can of diced tomatoes, black beans, corn, taco seasoning, cumin, coriander, sliced onions and whatever else caught my eye in the fridge and let it cook for almost an hour while we got changed from work. It turns into a great soup/stew with no watching. Did you overcook it? Add some more water back in, stir, and zap it for a few minutes longer and it will rehydrate.I would add that learning to handle a knife sped up my food production dramatically. That might have been the most enduring skill I kept from my chef's training other than how to fry onions, etc. without oil. However, several people in our group never worry about that. They buy their vegetables pre-sliced at the grocery store. They are willing to pay for the convenience. I figure if that makes this way of life easy for them, then go for it. We don't do that and our food costs stay ridiculously low. Instead of insane grocery bills, people learn that canned vegetables, dried grains, lentils, and beans cost almost nothing in comparison to how they might have shopped previously. There can be money leftover for more fresh vegetables and fruit. For some people, that will not be the case, of course. They can still eat well. I grew-up in a rural environment, playing on greasy 5 gallon pails of DDT and such. I will be honest and say that if I don't glow in the dark from those chemicals by now, I won't worry about whether something is organic. Having said that, though, I will also say that we grow a portion of our vegetables ourselves. I have found that if people are told they have to eat only organic produce they can become paralyzed by the cost and the lack of choice where they live. They are in far greater danger from the animal products they consume. I would leave-off talking to people about organic and non-GMO until they are skilled at eating plant-based. There is already lots in the news about it. When you eat 100% plant-based, no oil, the body develops incredible resources aimed at shutting down the nastier parts of DNA that might cause harm. Eating for health needs to be the primary focus and doing so needs to be made as simple, convenient, and cost-effective as possible so you don't need a doctorate to figure it out. People in many parts of the world do this daily with limited education. We should be able to figure it out with all the resources we have available. None of this will be easy. An editorial in the Western Producer has already come out against the changes. I think there are significant challenges to come. If it gets really bad, I urge the federal government NOT to give-up but perhaps change tactics. PLEASE get these skills into the hands who need them most - those with chronic health conditions. If we had not found this way of eating by accident, my husband would be dead. Every doctor's office in Canada should at least offer this information in a pamphlet. Every community nurse should have basic training. If no one else hears about it because of political pressure, please, please, please make sure that those who are at the greatest risks of dying, know they can help themselves get better, be free of medications, be free of dreaded illnesses and their horrible impacts on their lives. None of the doctors who treated my husband ever mentioned it even though he was dying. Please don't deny this "treatment" option for those with lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, kidney disease, multiple sclerosis, etc. - all inflammatory-based chronic conditions. At least reach out to that segment of the population. I call it my "10% Solution." Even the hardest of hearts could not deny these people the knowledge that will save their lives at any age. If nothing else, those who only see dollars should be made to understand that in doing so, it would literally shave billions off of healthcare costs in the country. If they won't listen to the science and the evidence from the thousands of cases like my husband who are alive and well and without any symptoms or medications, they might pay attention to the dollars that will be back in budgets at every single level of government throughout the country. The 10% deserve the chance to live. Please do not deny it to them no matter how bad the pressure gets. Members of this segment of the population might not choose to make the change but they deserve to at least be made aware of the option. As hard as it is to watch people die, in some cases in bits and pieces through amputations, small strokes, etc. that rob them more and more of their quality of life, I know from experience that the addiction to cheese (see the work of Dr. Neal Barnard if you want to argue about that), high fat foods, and animal products may have them turn away from life-giving options. Despite that, please let the others know. Please. No one deserves the horrendous emotional pain you go through each day watching your loved one slowly lose their life force. The pain is unbelievable. Push forward with these guidelines. They are incredibly important in order to save the lives of so many. Some of us are cheering you on so loudly that by now you should be wondering what the noise is!
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    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      Keep up the great work. You are right on the mark. Totally inspiring - all of your information!
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      • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
        Thank you! We learn something new every day.
    • biosoft8 over 2 years ago
      Great information! A plant-based diet is the way to go when it comes to problems with atherosclerosis. This type of heart disease runs in my family. In addition to your plant-based diet you may want to look into an Israeli study on pomegranate juice and a reduction of atheroscerotic plaque by 30% per year. http://naturalsociety.com/pomegranates-reduce-plaque-30-percent-heart-health/ In addition to this, I was at my cardiologist's office and a med student attended as well. We were discussing more natural kinds of treatment for heart disease since I cannot take prescription meds. The med student said that they have a patient that cleared his arteries with just pomegranate juice. I now drink it daily. You only need about 2 oz mixed with water. The study stated 100 ml. with water.
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      • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
        If you remove all oil from your diet - and I do mean all - and all animal products and eat whole food, plant-based, you will accomplish the same goal but even better. If you had liver issues associated with the heart disease then consuming fruit juice might be a little hard on that organ. In fact, consuming fruit juice is not recommended except on occasion. Think systemically when it comes to your body. A no oil, whole food, plant-based way of eating does not just repair heart disease, it addresses nearly all conditions associated with inflammatory-based conditions - lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, etc. Now, I don't want to burst your bubble of optimism but I went and read the original study (http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/71/5/1062.long) not the glossed over version. Here is what it actually said, quoting from their article: "Administration of PJ to 13 healthy men for 2 wk had no significant effect on the plasma lipid profile, including total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentrations (Table 1⇓). There was also no significant effect of increasing PJ doses on blood chemistry and plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns in 3 studied subjects, except that plasma glucose, cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentrations were 10–15% higher after 1 wk of supplementation with the highest PJ dose (80 mL/d) (data not shown). Similarly, no significant effect of PJ consumption on plasma lipid concentrations was shown in E0 mice (data not shown)." Notice that there was a significant increase in glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. That is what I would expect and that is also why the plant-based docs suggest consuming juice only occasionally. This protocol might actually aggravate conditions for diabetics. With triglycerides climbing, it also suggests the liver is not a happy camper. In fact, all three conditions they cite would have been significant red flags if my husband, when he was near death, had received this for treatment. The researchers are actually looking for the active properties in the juice that do have some sort of impact so they can put it into a pill form. That is the primary goal of all of these studies. When you read most studies from that perspective, it is easier to understand why they are approaching their problem in the manner they choose. There are literally hundreds and thousands of cases now where people switching to this other way of eating have reversed their conditions. A single juice is not going to do it and in fact, could be problematic. Also, the subjects in the study were not drinking every-day pomegranate juice. They were drinking a very specially prepared version of the juice. They provide the details in the study on how that was done. It in no way represents what one would get commercially. We have to think holistically. Nature set us up to heal ourselves which really amazed me. I figured we were supposed to get old and sick or limited. That's not what happens when you eat this other way. Check out the Forks Over Knives website or the success stories on the website of Dr. John McDougall. If you are dealing with heart disease, then it is absolutely essential that you go to YouTube and listen to a lecture by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr. on heart disease. You'll find it here: PLoqEkDBWDwN6iUVWsy4GF1GKj3kzWgDxF . He saved my husband's life when the only thing left as an option was a heart transplant. No oil, whole food, plant-based eating is so powerful for the body, it does not just slow down the progression of heart disease, it prevents it, and it REVERSES it. It took my husband from the point of the grave and gave him back his life. It has done that for hundreds and hundreds of others. You do not need anything special. You just need to eat those plants. It is very simple - not complicated, at all. If you're hanging out at a cardiologist's office, please watch Esselstyn's video. By the way, in the groups that support people with heart disease eating this way, there are some who have not had the results one might expect. Inevitably, as we probe what might be going wrong, hidden oil consumption is at the root of the more stubborn cases. They think a little won't hurt. This is where DNA comes in. If your body is susceptible to the damage from oil, a tiny amount might offend a great deal. One of the people in our local group found that out when his cholesterol, triglycerides, and inflammatory marker climbed dramatically. I'm getting good at interrogations and by the time we finished going through all the things he was doing right, we finally got to the cause. He had taken to eating crackers each night. The second ingredient in the crackers was palm oil. No one should be consuming that but for him it was like a match to tinder enough so that his inflammatory marker shot up. If you overeat whole bananas and other concentrated fructose sources, your triglycerides, etc. might climb but I have never seen the inflammatory marker get higher; his did. That's why I knew in addition to the excess bananas (4 per day + grapes) that probably impacted the triglycerides, something else was wrong. The good news is that his blood was checked a month after he corrected his actions and eliminated a highly processed food that contained oil - the crackers - everything was back to perfect. Some people might take much longer - months - to get back to normal. For this man, after 1 1/2 years of being on the right track, his body had healed from Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease sufficiently to fix itself after he quit doing it injury. By the way, in fall of 2016, doctors said that my husband no longer needs to see a cardiologist. He has no symptoms and no markers of heart disease. He's gone from us talking about what he wanted to do with the remaining weeks in his life, what we would do with his tools, etc., to three years later and he is no longer in need of a cardiologist. Esselstyn's approach is a tiny bit stricter than the others but it helps produce miracles. We got one when there was no hope left. Please do not let yourself get to that same point. Go with Esselstyn's approach now. One note . . . if you are on medications, you need to monitor things like blood pressure and cholesterol. You will heal so fast that you will rapidly be over-medicated. Pay attention to that. Cholesterol, etc. can plummet by over half within 2 weeks. My husband was one of those. Others start to get light-headed because the blood pressure medications are driving it down too low. This happens FAST. Medications go away quickly in a large number of cases; however, each person's "clean-up crew" seems to decide on what is killing you first and seems to attack issues in that order (based on my observations). Still, pay attention and write down your blood pressure numbers daily. Blood glucose numbers should also be noted if you are Type I or Type II. Those meds also need to be adjusted. Your body produces its own medications to fix things so the stuff you take externally can act like a double-whammy. Do not stop your medications. Monitor the total impact on the body. Some medications, if stopped abruptly, can CAUSE a heart attack. Docs have a hard time understanding the impact of eating this way. We send people to doctors where they have experience with other members from our local group who are eating this way as it has helped train the doctors to understand what is happening. Take care.
  • Diane Wagg over 2 years ago
    Education, education, education! I believe in the direction our new food guide is taking however, a lot of education is needed to help us use it. Our old way of cooking will no longer apply. Balanced recipes would be very useful to teach us this better way eating.
  • jjnel over 2 years ago
    Overall, the guide could be in plainer language, which would make it more understandable for a wider variety of people and age groups. I would suggest running the entire thing by an editing team with CLAD (clear language and design) skills.
  • Gaia over 2 years ago
    I agree with the comments above and it's definitely a step towards the rigth direction.I would add consumers need to be wary of gmo produce. Understand what they are and the long term implications on health. Also pesticide levels need to be looked at. You can eat all the fruits and vegetables you want but if they are loaded with pesticides and genetically modified, you are not doing your health any favours.Food for thought ;)
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      Anyone who is genuinely concerned about pesticides would surely address the TOP sources of pesticides and pollutants in the food supply and they are MEAT and MILK and from this 2011 joint report by the USDA and FDA ( http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/12-commonly-contaminated-foods ) it clearly states that " ... meat is contaminated with higher levels of pesticides than ANY plant food."
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      • hoochiemama over 2 years ago
        Every Canadian should be aware of this list - thank you!
      • Lori Curran over 2 years ago
        That is factory farm meat and milk and I totally agree that these are not healthy foods...you can source organic, grass fed, and naturally, humanely, and sustainably raised animal products from local family farmers, but it does cost more!
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        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          There is no difference in the components from organic, grass fed, free range (or what ever gimmick) meat and milk in comparison to factory farmed ones. It still has the unhealthy fat, high amounts of cholesterol, animal hormones that influence human body, viruses and bacteria that also infect humans ... etc. Mennonites eat organic meat, milk & eggs and have the same disease as non-organic eaters from around them, they are obese, they have same rates of cancer and even worse rates of diabetes. http://www.zmescience.com/other/science-abc/organic-food-science02092015/
        • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
          ( https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/is-organic-better-for-your-health-a-look-at-milk-meat-eggs-produce-and-fish/2014/04/07/036c654e-a313-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html?utm_term=.e81df33e19e9 )Bottom line on MILK: Organic milk has higher omega-3 fat levels, but probably not enough to make a difference. Exposure to pesticides, contaminants or hormones is not a significant risk in either organic or conventional milk.Bottom line on MEAT: There doesn’t seem to be much difference, health-wise, between organic or conventional meats. Grass-fed beef has a slight edge over grain-fed because of higher omega-3 levels, but the amounts are probably too small to affect human health.Bottom line on EGGS: There are no significant differences affecting health between organic and conventional eggs.
      • Gaia over 2 years ago
        My comment was no way endorsing meat and dairy. My objective is to ensure consumers are health conscientious and making the best decision for their families.
    • Moz over 2 years ago
      I think the hysteria against GMOs has gotten out of hand. (I blame Neil Young.) Please consider the following: "GM foods currently available on the international market have passed safety assessments and are not likely to present risks for human health. In addition, no effects on human health have been shown as a result of the consumption of such foods by the general population in the countries where they have been approved. Continuous application of safety assessments based on the Codex Alimentarius principles and, where appropriate, adequate post market monitoring, should form the basis for ensuring the safety of GM foods." Source: http://www.who.int/foodsafety/areas_work/food-technology/faq-genetically-modified-food/en/Plus, thousands of studies confirm no harm. Source: https://www.forbes.com/forbes/welcome/?toURL=https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonentine/2014/09/17/the-debate-about-gmo-safety-is-over-thanks-to-a-new-trillion-meal-study/&refURL=https://www.google.ca/&referrer=https://www.google.ca/
      Hide Replies (3)
      • Gaia over 2 years ago
        GMO foods have very high levels of pesticideds....You can buy all the GM foods you want for you and your family...Many countries have banned gmo foods for a reason. Further, there is something fundamentally wrong when a company starts owning seeds.
        Hide reply (1)
        • IcyMint over 2 years ago
          Companies owning seeds is a major concern especially for small farms, however, this is not a problem specific to GMOs but rather to patents and a company's ability to patent things so that they can charge whatever they want for them.
      • biosoft8 over 2 years ago
        You haven't mentioned that glyphosate, a carcinogen, is in GMO plant foods. You may have read about how Monsanto engineered GMO plants to become immune to Roundup which contains glyphosate. Roundup is applied then kills weeds but not the GMO plants. Then the GMO plant grows our food with the glyphosate in it. That's unfortunately why we have 85% of our food contaminated with glyphosate and why we now see commercials on TV about lawsuits for non-hodgkins lymphoma - a cancer that the attorneys apparently have evidence is caused by glyphosate.
    • RBruceSargent over 2 years ago
      There is nothing wrong with GMO's. There have been millions of GMO meals served and no ill health effects. Pesticides are monitored and insulating otherwise shows a lack of knowledge and understanding on your part.
  • Patricia Garcia over 2 years ago
    As a US citizen, I applaud Canada's new food guidelines based on science. I only wish the US government would follow your good example. Clearly, a plant based diet is the healthiest and best for people, animals and the environment. Thank you for spearheading this approach from a governmental standpoint.
  • Dave Cattermole over 2 years ago
    I agree .
  • Gudrun1111 over 2 years ago
    I support emphasizing the eating fresh whole foods and limiting or eliminating meat, egg, and dairy products, not only because these products have been linked to disease epidemics and environmental destruction but also - and even more so - because I don't think anybody should support the unnecessary torture of animals in the meat and dairy industries.Numerous studies have proved the benefits of reducing or eliminating red meat, chicken, fish, dairy, and eggs from our diets - probably at least partly because the animals in questions have been tortured so much that they have been sick from terror and fear during their entire life - and eating these animals or their products can therefore never be healthy. Plant-based diets can save thousands of animals and also help reduce our carbon footprint, save precious resources such as fresh water and fossil fuel. The government is obligated to act in the best interests of Canadian citizens. I think it is in the best interest of all to reduce our carbon footprint and thus global warming. It is also in the best interest of all to act on behalf of our Animal relatives. I'd therefore like to encourage the Canadian government to act responsibly and ethically by ensuring that Canada’s Food Guide recommendations strongly focus on plant-based foods. I would also encourage the Canadian government to strengthen Animal Rights not just in the food industry but in all areas of life. Thank you very much for your attention!Your sincerely,Gudrun Dreher, Ph.DUBC and FDU Vancouvergudrun@haidagwaii.net
  • katharine over 2 years ago
    I support the recommended revisions to Canada’s Food Guide that emphasize eating fresh whole foods and eliminating meat, egg, and dairy products, as these products have been linked to disease epidemics and environmental destruction. Numerous studies have proved the benefits of eliminating red meat, chicken, fish, dairy, and eggs from our diets. Plant-based diets can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases, help reduce our carbon footprints, and save precious resources such as fresh water and fossil fuel. Specifically, plant-focused diets have been shown to do the following:•Limit Cancer Risk•Reduce Heart Disease•Fight Diabetes•Curb Obesity•Increase Longevity•Reduce Our Carbon Footprint•Minimize Water Usage•Reduce Fossil Fuel Dependence The government is obligated to act in the best interests of Canadian citizens. Accordingly, I encourage the Canadian government to act responsibly and ethically by ensuring that Canada’s Food Guide recommendations strongly focus on plant-based foods. Thank you.
  • London8000 over 2 years ago
    PLEASE CHANGE THE FOOD GUIDE TO REDUCE MEAT AND DAIRY IN THE DIET, AND INCREASE PLANT BASED FOOD. Thank you. Jane.
  • golfer49 over 2 years ago
    Finally, the government is working for the people and not listening to the large corporations. My family are free enterprisers but not at the risk of poor health for people of our sickly planet. If its not too late, we are on the right path here. Just keep moving toward "real" food for Canadians (ie. our own community gardens, non GMO, less involvement with marketing boards and large corporations, more healthy advertising for the public). We can do this!
    Hide reply (1)
    • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
      Why not plant fruit trees on boulevards and fruit bearing bushes like blueberries, raspberries. Imagine walking out onto your street at harvest time and sharing the wealth of nature, free of charge, with your friends and families. Sharing home made jams with your neighbours. You are correct golfer49!
  • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
    As a registered nurse in Canada I see first hands the effects of disease in relation to diet. This is an excellent start in the right direction. We are not meant to drink another species breast milk. Cheese is full of salt, fat and pus. Dairy is a significant cause of obesity, bone loss and diabetes. Meat is extremely toxic to people and cancer causing. When an animal is threatened and murdered they have high levels of cortisol which we are ingesting when we eat meat. Not to mention high concentrations of pesticides and herbicides from the food that the animal eats. Health care is costing an unnecessary fortune. The government really needs to focus on educating people on healthy diets and exercise.
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    • ginpow over 2 years ago
      Nancy, I agree with most of what you say. As a former nurse I saw the direct causal relationship between an animal-based diet and a plant-based diet.An animal-based diet is not only destroying our health, but destroying the planet as well.I sum it up with these words: the moral implications of killing another living beings with whom we share the planet with has serious repercussions on our health, and planet. We are killing billions of animals every year, but they are killing us as we eat them.
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      • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
        I totally agree with what you way. There are karmic and spiritual repercussions in regards to eating killed nutrition. There are so many reasons why we should not eat meat. I think if most people had to kill the food they eat they would not eat it because they could not kill a living thing. Unfortunately it takes science to prove these things. It states clearly in the bible what we are to use for food: Every plant bearing species. Unfortunately science also results in more suffering to animals for animal testing. Humans have lost their way.
      • Nancy Shappit over 2 years ago
        See below ginpow. I also wanted to add that I am constantly advocating to friends, family and strangers to eat a plant based diet. I also refer people to the book called 'The China Study'. There are several great documentaries on netflix as well regarding plant based diets and their effects on the environment. As a member for Mercy for Animals I have watched the conditions of the animals in these factory farms. It is truly disgusting what goes on. If one has half a heart, after watching these videos, you truly are left with no choice but to change. And when you do your health improves significantly. Regardless of what the government does we have to help our fellow man and all species on the planet by spreading the word.
    • raw53 over 2 years ago
      i completely agree with you nancy shappit and its great to be hearing this from someone in the medical industry say this. fruits/berries/melons/raw and some cooked veg/some nuts and seeds, herbs/botanics are all we need!its quick and easy to put together a meal affordable when you don't buy meat, fish, dairy or grains and garbage food! we can learn to heal ourselves with the foods mother nature has provided us thats appropriate to our species! let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food! prevention rather than management of dis-ease!
  • Jackie Maguire over 2 years ago
    Not only are meat and dairy sources of saturated fat--they are contaminated with pesticides--since they are high-up on the food chain
  • Jackie Maguire over 2 years ago
    This is good advice. Kids who grow up eating processed and fast foods are much more likely to become diabetic, much more likely to be grossly overweight, and much more likely to stress our health system in the longterm
  • cobaltblu over 2 years ago
    I support the recommended revisions to Canada’s Food Guide that emphasize eating fresh whole foods and limiting or eliminating meat, egg, and dairy products, as these products have been linked to disease epidemics and environmental destruction.
    Hide reply (1)
    • RBruceSargent over 2 years ago
      Vegans are just copying and pasting the exact same line over and over onto this comment thread.
  • Catherine A over 2 years ago
    Very pleased about the dairy issue. We in my family since the yearly days starting in 1971 have been in and out of hospital as a result of dairy for our whole family. The doctors had no idea and we were fed dairy every day while there and some of us close to death. I discovered this on my own and now our family is healthy. We cost the health care system for 3 months total in hospital all due to dairy.
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    • RBruceSargent over 2 years ago
      Just because your family has an intolerance to milk does not mean everyone should stop using it. Have you ever heard of A2 Milk? It is considered a health drink which is easier to digest. People who have intolerance to milk have been able to drink A2.
  • golfer49 over 2 years ago
    We are on the right path here
  • JacquelineZim over 2 years ago
    I support the recommended revisions to Canada’s Food Guide that emphasize eating fresh whole foods and limiting or eliminating meat, egg, and dairy products, as these products have been linked to disease epidemics and environmental destruction. Numerous studies have proved the benefits of reducing or eliminating red meat, chicken, fish, dairy, and eggs from our diets. Plant-based diets can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases, help reduce our carbon footprints, and save precious resources such as fresh water and fossil fuel. Specifically, plant-focused diets have been shown to do the following:Limit Cancer RiskReduce Heart DiseaseFight DiabetesCurb ObesityIncrease LongevityReduce Our Carbon FootprintMinimize Water UsageReduce Fossil Fuel DependenceThe government is obligated to act in the best interests of Canadian citizens. Accordingly, I encourage the Canadian government to act responsibly and ethically by ensuring that Canada’s Food Guide recommendations strongly focus on plant-based foods. Thank you.
  • Jennifer Humphries over 2 years ago
    Absolutely! Knowledge is power. The researchers who prepared the guidelines and recommendations have amassed a wealth of evidence that should be used to develop usable material for Canadians. Given our busy lives, it is challenging to spend a lot of time on food preparation every day, but the material developed could provide guidance on finding quick and easy recipes, shortcuts, and ‘store-bought’ meals that are nutritious and convenient – and affordable! In regard to eating out, HappyCow.net and other web-based resources can be used to identify restaurants that offer plant-based options. Overall, Canadians have been “marketed to” massively over the past few decades. It is critically important that they now be offered information and guidance material that is solidly evidence-based, and set within the broader context of environmental sustainability. And of course, while some print documents will be useful, the material must be largely web-based, evolving, continuously updated and refreshed.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
      Sorry - I meant to comment on another post. The system won't let me delete this comment.
    • ginpow over 2 years ago
      Jennifer, all scientific based FACTS come down to one issue: if people don't convert to a plant-based diet then we will not have an inhabitable earth. The numerous multiple environment effects of an animal-based diet are well documented, but so are the negative effects on our health.It's absolutely essential for people to start thinking this way, and then make the change to an animal-based diet.I think you would agree with me, and thank you for posting the website. It was very helpful.
  • cassandraheaven over 2 years ago
    People have it in their heads that eating healthy is expensive, but with proper planning and shopping on a budget can help and even save money!!
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    • Moz over 2 years ago
      As a Vancouverite I wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. True, select brands of healthier foods (Yves products, for example) are readily available in most outlets. However, the inflation of fruit, veggies, fish, nuts, seeds, and spices have risen in the past year. (Source: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/cpis08a-eng.htm) Alarming NGOs as Oxfam. (source: https://www.oxfam.ca/grow/learn/why_food_prices_are_rising). There are definitely ways to save money (I no longer eat meat, in large part because of the cost), but wind up shopping more frequently to ensure a steady supply of fruit and veg. To compensate, I often prolong my periods of hunger as I do not buy incidentals or many snack items. And to be honest, I may a decent wage. Food prices are out of whack. Perhaps that is beyond the scope of HC, I don't know. In any case, to your point I say this: EATING is expensive. Period.
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      • cassandraheaven over 2 years ago
        All I was saying is there are ways to save money while shopping for fresh produce and other items: Buy from local farmers, buy produce that is in season, price matching, stock up on frozen and bulk items, or grow your own rather than buying expensive junk in a box!
  • Jericko over 2 years ago
    WOW! I am pleasantly surprised at this absolutely marvellous news. Hopefully this will continue, becoming the new guide. I am “”almost”” in belief that Health Canada is actually proposing this. Lets all give them round of applause. Looking for more forward thinking from the Government in regards to our health. Jericko Orangeville
  • Roisin Doria over 2 years ago
    Cooking at home is way more healthily for your family. You can control salt and addiditives. Placing these recommendations into the food guide is a great idea
  • AnnieD1969 over 2 years ago
    One thing that I notice is that the "summary of Phase 1 consultations" discusses "food quantitites / portion sizes" in detail, but this message doesn't come through too clearly in the guidelines themselves. I was happy to see notes regarding "limiting" (via %DV) of sugars, saturated fat and processed foods, but they did not talk about significantly increasing intake of green vegetables (which probably has the most science behind it for health promotion)
  • Bryon Hill over 2 years ago
    We should go back to the basics and start teaching cooking and gardening in school
  • mohaken over 2 years ago
    Preparing our own food lets us know what we are consuming. Eating out, or eating convenience foods is like eating in the dark. They almost always contain substances we can't pronounce, and they are filled with inorganic pesticides and GMOs. When eating out, we don't wish to pay money and tips to get our body filled with strange additives. We believe that the food guide should also recommend 100% certified organic foods, or at least foods with the label Non-GMO Project Verified instead of "conventional" foods.
  • Frances Cunliffe over 2 years ago
    No amount of knowledge will help the consumer if the govt. won't let us have our food labeled GMO or not. So we can put our knowledge to good use in protecting ourselves. Cook from scratch, with known ingredients. Create your own meals and snacks, and eat together with family and friends!
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    • Nan over 2 years ago
      I agree that life would be much simpler if our Government responded to our need to have GMO foods labeled as such. In the meantime, and you said it 'cook from known ingredients', which is another way of saying that we are speaking with our pocketbook and sooner or later, as our own practices start moving up the track andgaining momentum, surely Govt will get out of the caboose and assume a truly helpful role toward the food consumer on this particular issue.
  • Jaunmax over 2 years ago
    I agree with the guiding principals. Please keep the lobbyists away from this consultation as they are not motivated by anything good for humans!
  • Nan over 2 years ago
    Not sure where. this would best fit: Know the source of what you are buying/eating as the consequences are not small. Is your salmon 'farm fished'. Is your beef raisedin a Feed Lot Operation or Grass-Fed? Is your produce covered in 'glyphosate' i.e is it a GMO. Is the sweeter chemically derived, for ex. aspartame, Splenda.
  • Angelam.cameron over 2 years ago
    Absolutely agree with all three points.
  • Anita over 2 years ago
    The guiding principles will be of absolutely no value if the big industries like dairy, meat or softdrink, etc., with their deep pockets, will be allowed to lobby the government in order to water down the guidelines.
  • Jansenadria@hotmail.com over 2 years ago
    Removed by moderator.
  • DBlais over 2 years ago
    This is great! My thoughts on knowledge -why not have a Healthy Eating Awareness Month on those key points as they do for planning finances for example and invite food health specialist, nutritionist and dieticiens share their knowledge then for Skils - then give workshops and demonstrations on how to prepare healthy meals - how to prepare meals using other proteins.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      most all doctors, specialists, nutritionists and dieticians still have and perpetuate misinformation that is based on industry's interests rather than evidence based science.
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      • hoochiemama over 2 years ago
        For dietary education and support I avoid ALL of the above professions and consult with my naturopathic doctor. Via nutrition and supplements, she has assisted me in losing weight and correcting a severe gut dysbiosis, caused mostly by the yeast/fungus Candida Albicans, a very common and distressing condition still mostly ignored and "poo-pooed" by mainstream, allopathic medicine in Canada.
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        • morgandunn over 2 years ago
          A holistic nutritionist would be a good alternative also! Often we work closely with ND's and look at the whole body instead of just the symptom and one single system. A lot of us work with people to correcting dysbiosis and candida.
  • RosePepper over 2 years ago
    A good idea. This could be taught in schools, Family Studies programs and Health class. Encourage kids to reach for those healthier options.
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    • Filiatrault_t over 2 years ago
      Sugar, for example, is so ingrained into the food system that most young children are accessing. Doesn't matter the socioeconomic status of the kids. What is available at the corner store or grocery store and the parents seem to influence their kids' food choices the most. It's in the curriculum, but what are the stats on students taught healthy choices and the number of times they choose healthy over unhealthy options?
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    • Moz over 2 years ago
      Is nutrition even on the curriculum in schools? I have long since graduated and can only recall taking an elective in grade 11. That said, I am sure there was some education during my founding years. But that's ancient history. I would like to know how closely together HC and the Education Minister discuss this issue of nutrition education? For adults, nutrition courses are taught at many colleges, including community colleges. Whether they are affordable for the average person is another issue. For adults looking for free online resources, there is none better than https://www.coursera.org/browse/life-sciences/nutrition?languages=en
      Hide reply (1)
      • Filiatrault_t over 2 years ago
        Yes, in BC it is. As a teacher, I love how we are given the flexibility to speak about health and to talk about what it means to eat mindfully and explore influences on healthy choices. My students thought maybe the government spends $60,000 helping people who are sick from preventable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. They were shocked to find out the cost is in the billions. For example grade 7: https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/physical-health-education/7Big Idea: Healthy choices influence our physical, emotional, and mental well-being.Curricular Content: factors that influence personal eating choices (food options at home,personal preference, cultural heritage, food allergies )Curricular Competencies:- Investigate and analyze influences on eating habits- Identify factors that influence healthy choices and explain their potential health effectsAssess and communicate health information for various health issues Grade 7 Applied Design, Skills and Technology: https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/adst/7Food Studies- basic food handling and simple preparation techniques and equipment- factors in ingredient use, including balanced eating/nutrition, function, and dietary restrictions- factors that influence food choices, including cost, availability, and family and cultural influences
  • carolyn rowse over 2 years ago
    Excellent! Hats off to Canada!
  • adameslie over 2 years ago
    Health Canada could take this a step further and encourage manufactures and grocery stores to include the planning and preparing of healthy meals in their packaging. Perhaps by strategically placing information and recipes in the store (where coupons normally are) Menu planning systems and information for the general public. Such as a website that you can plan your meals for the week in accordance with the Canada food guide and it will help you decide what to shop for based on that information.
  • Ron over 2 years ago
    My response to this Guiding Principles consultation is based on my experience over the years and the KETOGENIC WAY OF EATING. (See a world of stunning info on UTube.)In the absence of eating carbs (sugar), the body naturally switches over to burning fat(ketones) as its energy fuel source and is known as ketosis. In ketosis, the body burns all sources of fat for energy. If it doesn’t see the required amount of fat in the food eaten, it draws it out of the body’s fat storage including out of the arteries, veins, blood and fatty organs. The ketogenic eating macros vary slightly in percentages, but in general has low carbs less than 5%, moderate protein approx. 15%, and high fat approx. 80%. It takes the body from a few days to few weeks to make the transition from carb (sugar) burning to fat (ketone) burning but once there, previous hunger and cravings experienced eating carbs, disappear. There are 2 reasons for this. The first is that eating fat induces a sense of contented fullness or satiety. The second reason is that the blood sugar spikes and crashes experienced eating carbs (sugar) does not happen as the body is only burning fat for energy. I am 68 years old and have always struggled with my weight. I have tried almost every diet out there with poor or temporary results. They all left me feeling unsatisfied with cravings and hunger. I did not consume sugar at all and sweet foods only occasionally. I did eat what I thought were healthy carbs like potatoes, yams, whole grain breads and pastas. I also leaned towards a plant base protein but would eat some meat and poultry. At Christmas 2016, I weighed 265 pounds, my blood sugar was 8.9 and had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Among other problems I also experience pain from inflammation through my body and poor digestion.January 1, 2017, I started the ketogenic way of eating. I experience a couple of ups and downs for a few days but could feel my body making the transition from sugar burning to fat burning. Within a week, my hunger and cravings disappeared. I did not need to eat as much and I felt satisfied after a meal and not bloated. One by one, my problems disappeared.Mid-March, two and a half months into ketosis, I had blood work done. My blood sugar dropped from 8.9 to 5.2. All other tests were good. No sign of diabetes.June 26, 2017, now, I feel great. I love the way I eat and what I eat and I would not change it for the world. My weight has dropped from 265 pounds January 1st, to 222 pounds today, that 43 pound loss in less than 6 months. This was not exercise dependent at all.This journey has been a huge learning and eye opening experience for me. These insights I want to share with my fellow Canadians. My words do not do the ketogenic way of eating justice. My sincerest hope is that you will take this to the next level, click KETO, KETOSIS, KETOGENIC on Google or UTube so you can help yourself and others.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      quackery with no basis in science, low carb diets are detrimental to health and cause insulin resistance, heart disease and increase rates of cancer
    • andrejolicoeur over 2 years ago
      It's great that you found a diet structure that works for you, and congrats on your newfound healthy lifestyle! But there's no magic in the Ketogenic approach. You lost weight because you were eating in a calorie deficit, and your blood sugar and diabetes improved because you lost weight. Ketogenic diets are well ejoyed by many people - but macronutrient intake ratios should always be a personal choice and are not relevant to general health recommendations for a populace.
  • Seriousmam over 2 years ago
    I think the addition of stop signs and triangle is a terrible idea. Beyond the controversial nature of Health Canada stated judgement with regards to naturally occurring fats in foods, have they considered the impact on people with mental health challenges? Can you imagine the problems it could create for some individuals with eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder? It could be nightmarish. The warning signs should not be used period. The Minister underestimates her citizens and is overreaching her mandate. Nutritional labels are sufficient combined with other efforts to improve food quality and safety and continuing education.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      How about Dr John McDougalls traffic light system. Read "The healthiest Diet on the Planet"
      Hide reply (1)
      • William over 2 years ago
        The McDougall traffic light system would work as-is fairly well, even if a wider consensus would change some foods from red to yellow. For example, some types of fish and game meats would probably end up yellow if not green.
    • GoodFoodHeals over 2 years ago
      Labels are not adequate: we need to label GMOs. Those foods are high in glyphosate residues (among other problems) and the ability to avoid GMOs would in and of itself make a huge contribution to a healthier population. Roundup is toxic.
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      "Nutritional labels are sufficient" ... but current state of affairs point to the opposite of your statement.
  • calmontes over 2 years ago
    Excelente recommendation. Food preparation skills are critical because if it doesn't taste good for many the easy option is to buy processed/prepared food. We are also losing traditional techniques that help better absorb nutrients in food.
  • KristineMcc over 2 years ago
    There are a missing step - #4 avoiding toxins and additives in foods. Canadians need to be able to clearly see these in labels.
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  • William Schill over 2 years ago
    I have my fears that the labelling will be heavily influenced by the food industry who have, to this point, proven themselves to be less than reliable when it comes to health promotion. The bottom line is we need to "flip the pyramid". Eliminate refined carbohydrates altogether. Get adequate protein intake (~0.8gm/kg/day), healthy fats, and if you want to add carbohydrates, have them come from whole, natural foods. Personally, my daily goal is to try and consume "zero" grams of carbohydrates (which is nearly impossible in this society) with the expectation that I might end up with 30-40gm per day which is probably the right amount for normal brain function. We need to change the message that our diabetic patients are receiving from Diabetes Education Centres around the country that they must have a minimum of 130gm of carbohydrates a day. With advice like that, it is no wonder we are seeing an epidemic of diabetes rather than improvement. Hyperinsulinemia is the root cause of all of our issues with respect to obesity and diabetes in this country. Once we can convince the masses of this, we will be on our way to reversing the epidemic.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      Low-carb diets are detrimental to health, they cause early death with more complications, diabetes is a disease of fat-toxicity, high blood sugars is a symptom, not the cause or the problem. Healthiest and longest living people on earth eat low fat high carb diets. Rural China, Central Africa, Papua Highlanders, Tarahumara Indians, Okinawa, Sardinia, Ikara, Nicoya .... all eat very little animal products and have (had) virtually no heart disease, obesity and diabetes.
  • Murphy888 over 2 years ago
    "Selecting nutritious foods when shopping or eating out" should include NO GMO'S! Shop the perimeter of the grocery store because of all of that hidden GMO JUNK. It is likely that 95% of the foods found in a grocery store have some GMO ingredients... however we don't know because we don't label GMO's here. I avoid Canola Oil, citric acid, all corn products, all sugar beet products, all soy products, high fructose corn syrup, MSG, whey, xanthin gum, and the list goes on. Clean food is a right and I think we need to look at the reasons why so many countries have made banning GMO a priority. When will Canada listen to logic and protect Canadians' from these damaging products. Clean food = better health.
  • Cleanlittleplates over 2 years ago
    I think that incorporating a definition of "Whole Foods" (any food in its natural state-- nuts, seeds, fruit, vegetables, eggs, ethically raised meats...) is useful to include in what sorts of foods to buy and meals to prepare. Sharing meals does seem a bit odd for nutritional purposes! I would argue that social eating can cause overeating and mindless eating at times!
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      "ethically raised meats", organic, pasture fed, free range, cage free ... etc etc do not change the mechanisms and components in animal products that cause disease in humans, any meat, milk, egg consumption is associated with negative effects on health.
  • Josée over 2 years ago
    Use the natural whole ingredients. Cook from scratch! Example: bake a chicken, then create burritos or grain dish to go! Read all the ingredients on packaging. If something is not familiar or too weird, like mechanically sorted chicken parts...no just no. They should have the ingredients listed slightly larger on packaging. Google ingredients, too. Sometimes they are not as bad as they sound or your body is craving it.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      Out of all meats studied, chicken was associated with the most amount of weight gain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22223576 and it is the #1 source of Cholesterol in the American diet, it is also full of salt and pesticides and pollutants (organic or not) so hardly would be meaningful to include it / mention it in Healthy Food Guidelines.
  • reitsmad over 2 years ago
    A good thing. Teach people to read labels of processed food so they understand what they are eating. When eating out the nutritional makeup should be readily available die to hidden sugar.
  • Janet Hudgins over 2 years ago
    A good thing to shift the emphasis away from animal food from all levels: humans, animals and the planet. But, we will have to learn to respect plant life as it is a living thing, too.
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    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      there are fundamental differences between animals and plants, main thing being sentience because of the nervous system
  • annamarie.mceachern@gmail.com over 2 years ago
    I think these are great but super vauge. We need to change the education system to teach all kids about healthy food choices, how to shop and the impact of various foods on the environment. To make this guideline immediately more effective, it should reference other resources about how to shop, and recipes (either Canada's or a credible other source)
    Hide Replies (2)
    • Filiatrault_t over 2 years ago
      It's in the curriculum in BC! We need up to date scientifically backed resources for teachers to help with this process!
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      And show CO2 footprints of different foods ( animal foods vs plant foods ) and the Water footprint of these foods to make kids and people aware of their choices if they care about the environment and the health of the future generations.
  • Vegucatordotcom over 2 years ago
    Canadians are bombarded with mixed messages from media, doctors and corporations. I would suggest Canadians be given specific strategies on how they can "select nutritious foods". Example: Read nutrition labels and Read the ingredients, along with information about how to do that.
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  • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
    It would be important to also point out what foods are calorically dense but nutritionally poor. For example processed foods and animal based foods contain high amounts of empty calories (mainly fats and simple sugars) and do not provide adequate amounts of Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Fiber, Folate and Magenesium (all are micronutrients lacking in Western diets)
  • eljefe over 2 years ago
    Agree on all 3, but it's easier said than done, imo. They should have red, yellow green labels on each product. Green being the healthiest and red the most unhealthy food that you can put in your mouth. Only by making it easy will people actually think before they buy life debilitating and shortening food.
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    • KWall over 2 years ago
      The only issue with this is that it reinforces the idea of 'good' and 'bad' foods, which can reinforce shame and guilt with eating certain foods.
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      • eljefe over 2 years ago
        True, but when the stakes are so high, sometimes anything but drastic measure will do. Just like the pictures on the cigarette packs
    • Eugen S. over 2 years ago
      Yes in Europe they have a similar scheme for house appliances depending on how efficient they are, they have color coded and grade coded stickers on the appliances when sold in stores, nice and large so you can see it from far away, so even if you are color blind or can't see well you are still able to make a better choice if you are looking for a better alternative.
  • Shirle 7 over 2 years ago
    It's too little too late! Health Canada should be recommending that everyone eat less meat and dairy and the largest portion on people's dinner plates should be vegetables, not meat or fish.
  • Croninton1 over 2 years ago
    Males sense, limitations to adding sodium, sugar, to processed products should be mandatory as well. Artificial sweeteners have to be better screened and permitted for consumption too.
  • saltyanne over 2 years ago
    It's good to cook from scratch or learn to do so. I usually do and eat leftovers the next day and often cook in bulk and freeze meals. I shop weekly, plan my meals and make a list, using lots of beans and fresh vegetables.
  • Adml over 2 years ago
    I think Shoppers set out to buy nutritious foods but sometimes lack of preparation or ideas or price changes the choices they make.Maybe suggested recipes by produce would engage in healthy preparation or demos.I don't know that the comment on sharing meals with family and friends is needed. In general I think whenever time allows us to get together we do that and don't need a reminder?
  • Mary Durand over 2 years ago
    will be difficult with so many ethnic cultures in canada
  • Sandra yelle over 2 years ago
    I'm happy about the proposed changes that will better educate the citizens of Canada , support better nutrition while protecting our environment . The changes are long over due and will make Canada one of the leading countries in better nutrition with far reaching effects to our health and sustaining food sources .
  • jerrilintackshop over 2 years ago
    My only real concern with our food is the horrendous suffering caused to our fellow creatures by factory farming. This has to stop, either by diet change or some way of ensuring humaneness in raising our food.
  • judith goldberg over 2 years ago
    I agree completely with this guideline as well. Families need to understand how to prepare nutritious foods from scratch for their children. Food should be prepared on the weekend and then divided into what I call, "Happy Meals" all ready to go and placed in the lunch bag during the morning rush to get out of the house. Food can also be measured so we are aware of how much food we are eating. Processed food should never form any part of a lunch for children or for adults. I am so glad Canada's food guide has made these changes. People and of course animals will be very thankful with these changes as we continue to work toward reducing our meat and dairy consumption. Well done and keep up the good work!!!! The next goal should be to end factory farming.
  • Fee0101 over 2 years ago
    I am very excited to read the new recommendations. Up to now it was mostly documentaries that helped me to learn about healthier living (e.g. What the Health or documentaries about sugar), but to read it now here makes me very happy!!
  • aand over 2 years ago
    Knowledge and skills about eating are as much about being tuned into your body and responding appropriately as they are about having healthy foods available in your house when you are hungry. A lot of people use food to deal with emotions or to reward themselves. CFG could incorporate education about the process of eating, not just what you are eating
  • ks67gibson over 2 years ago
    I am hopeful that the new recommendations link to the Eat Well Plate. This concept is much easier to teach and follow that serving sizes.
  • RichieRich over 2 years ago
    HelloAs someone who has not eaten any animal, including dairy for 8 years, I fully support this new change and encourage you to extended it to eliminating the other disastrous category: meat.The question is: are you going to cave in an not adopt this new change for the better when the dairy industry giants put on the pressure?i strongly encourage you to hold your ground if you truly care about the health and education of our children, as well as the animals that have severe suffering as the result of being subjected to the dairy industry...not to mention the very planet that we are quickly destroying!Thank you
  • Jan Dyer over 2 years ago
    I support this principle
  • Marjorie over 2 years ago
    I've read many of the comments but one thing that seems to be lacking in these comments is how to know the appropriate servings for people of different weights, heights and work/lifestyles. And just what is the serving size: is it one cup, half a cup, what? If a person who is already overweight continues to eat the maximum number of servings per day, that person will continue to gain weight, no matter if you are a meat eater or a plant eater.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      funny, serving sizes with this kind of diet do not need to be set anymore. your body will adapt to this and you will have a healthy weight to boot. been there done it and feel great
    • Jane Madden over 2 years ago
      Wolfgang Theiss (below) has it correct. Over time, the body requests what it needs when you skip the oil and processed foods and eat plant-based whole foods.
    • KWall over 2 years ago
      I like the idea of something visual to help people out with this. For example, the Harvard Healthy Eating plate is a simple and visual way for the general population to judge portions and proportions of what they're eating.
  • KWall over 2 years ago
    'Nutritious foods' is a very vague term that may require some explanation. It may be helpful to include the idea of cooking from scratch instead of buying for convenience, and being conscious of ingredients of the food that you buy (such as terms that you can pronounce and recognize). These points are overall quite vague and may require more explanation for much of Canada's population. For planning, plan meals ahead of time to reduce consumption of fast food and convenience foods, for example.
  • royale over 2 years ago
    i agree with many of the comments below that the guidelines are not specific enough, and that for the most part, people won't know what they actually mean. the first two guidelines are no brainers - of course people who care about healthy eating want to choose, plan and prepare healthy foods, but what does that actually look like in practice? the main point i have an issue with though is the third one around sharing meals. as a single person who lives alone, is this recommendation telling me that my lifestyle is negatively impacting my nutrition, because i'm not sharing meals with others? the brazil guidelines that a group of physicians posted in another forum say something along the lines of getting together with others to share tips and tricks around food preparation. this is worlds away from sharing meals with family and friends, and far better. i mean really, am i supposed to invite friends over every night for dinner, just so i don't eat alone? is that really going to make me a more nutritious eater? in my experience, it will actually make me a less nutritious eater, because my friends usually go out for fast food. this is not a feasible guideline for me, and i don't have the supports in my life to make it happen. in a similar way, i bet others could look at points one or two and say, well gosh, i'd love to eat healthy, but i just can't afford it. i like the brazil guidelines better because they are short, simple and to the point, and yet provide more specific information than these guidelines. these guidelines don't really tell people any more than they already know.
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    • Marjorie over 2 years ago
      I also live alone and I have invited my neighbor for meals, he always refuses as he likes to eat his meals in front of the tv watching sports. he won't even go to his daughter's home for special meals as it involves stairs. He cooks, cleans, shops etc but his diet is high in meat protein and his weight shows it. He would never choose to eat lentils or beans but he does also eat veggies. I don't mind eating alone because I like the silence but unlike Wolfgang I have not found that being vegan leads to lower weight. In fact I've gained weight over the past 6 months and I do not like it one bit. Years ago mothers stayed at home in the kitchen cooking meals, not always the most nutritious either, but most of the girls of my generation took HomeEc in school and learned the basics. I have learned more about nutritious foods since I retired and began reading cookbooks for ideas and I do grow a small garden with salad greens, fresh tomatoes when in season, green/yellow beans, beets, etc. But serving sizes and the size, age, mobility, etc. leave many of us wondering how much to eat. I know a very slender older than me, lady who eats toast and tea for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch and very little for supper, she never feels hungry, I feel hungry even when I know I shouldn't be. sorry for ranting on and on. I've been on this rollercoaster of weight loss/weight gain my entire life and I really thought being a vegan would be the answer, for me, it hasn't.
  • DonnaJ over 2 years ago
    Health Canada has to stop promoting artificial water fluoridation...it's based on fraudulent science from the 50s and they have already admitted they have no peer reviewed studies that demonstrate hydrofluorosilicic acid is either safe for human consumption or effective at preventing cavities.
  • Tonitabh over 2 years ago
    Mandatory home economics classes for middle school and junior high students where they learn healthy cooking skills.
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    • A1teacher over 2 years ago
      Once again, putting pressure on our school system to do a job that parents should do in the home. Shop, cook and eat healthy meals with your children from infancy. Everyone will be better off.
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      • aileen over 2 years ago
        Well, it would be ideal that healthy eating be taught in the home. Unfortunately home is where unhealthy habits originate. Parents need to be educated. Maybe the school system needs to take a look at what children need to thrive - rote learning things to be regurgitated on an exam may not be the best use of time.
      • andrejolicoeur over 2 years ago
        Our school system is a source of knowledge for children in many areas, and this is one area that no child should be left ignorant. Learning about food and health can and should be taught to children regardless of the values or knowledge of their parents.
      • Beth Bristow over 2 years ago
        Schools and home life need to work together. Look at some early education books from the early 1900's everything was taught in school.
      • GoodFoodHeals over 2 years ago
        Most families need both parents to work just to make ends meet. There is no time for these parents to teach children to cook. Many parents have already lost the skills they would have had to share. Schools throughout Western society used to teach cooking as part of the standard curriculum and they should do it again. This kind of nutrition and skills education is FAR more important than some of the garbage schools are mandated to teach these days and the effects of an educated child will have far-reaching positive consequences for chronic illness in Canada.Sadly, the pharmaceutical industry business model thrives on people being sick, not well. It is these kinds of corporations that are controlling government. Because of this relationship, the government is in a death spiral and the only way we can get out is by growing our own food (collectively and individually) and getting the government out of the (food) equation. The government will not heal itself—it is, by default, a self-serving entity.
  • hoogent over 2 years ago
    I think that the new food guide is the latest feel good trends. Obesity and bad food choices are a result of convenience and ease of serving. The food guide should stick to include ways to get people away from processed food
  • hoogent over 2 years ago
    I think that using a very simple coding system is not good. It's like a lottery if the product gets a green code. Good food education should begin at home.
  • Beth Bristow over 2 years ago
    Why do we keep changing it. Education from the start is what is needed. Growing up fast food just started so why in the last 50 years have we changed that much including what goes on the food. GMO's, pesticides etc. that's when problems started. Get back to basics.
  • isa19961 over 2 years ago
    I believe it is very important to make people aware not only of food waste but also of the waste from food packaging. The guide should recommend buying bulk, when possible, using reusable containers, bags and produce bags.
  • Good foodie over 2 years ago
    I became a vegan cold turkey on July 26, 2016. I have also been 10 years vegetarian in the past. I think that the new proposed Canada food guide is a step in the right direction. I was never a big meat eater but I'm am not going to condemn meat eaters as it will take time to wean people off meat.I enjoy cooking now. I love seeing the colors and tasting the different textures of food on my plate. I became really creative with preparing vegetables and grains.Food is exciting for me again.
  • Julia G over 2 years ago
    Very good!
  • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
    I think they are great changes. I seriously think that this would bring the cost of healthcare down significantly. Being a heart attack survivor that did not take well to statins I underwent this change myself. I did so well with this that today I can live normal. I even got passed by Transport Canada to fly a glider. They are very stringent with their requirements and usually demand a certain prescribed treatment. I am lifting weights that I have not been able to lift in my 20s. I certainly think this is one of many steps in the right direction.
  • AnnPedersen over 2 years ago
    Knowledge and skills (of healthy eating) are just one part of the equation to health. The knowledge and skills need to be aligned with other Canadian recommendations such as physical fitness, and work/life balance. It's time the various departments relating to health work together.Running to the various, and endless, activities and events for children and adults may actually be interfering with appropriate mental development as well. Does a 7 year-old really need to be involved in 4 activities each week just because the friends are? Who decides what the activities for a 9-year old should be? Has this even been discussed with the 11-year old? When does the 8-year old get an opportunity to "just be" or observe nature and all it's wonders? It may be the best teacher out there. It's no surprise that children are experiencing activity burn-out when they turn 13 . . . just when they need to be in activities.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      fully agree with you. however this is the Canada food guide. I guess we need a Canada exercise guide as well
  • washlock over 2 years ago
    I find that it is almost impossible to make healthy choices in restaurants. I think that if there were more healthy options in restaurants, people would eat better at home as well. People model what they cook at home after what they see in restaurants.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      Actually most places will change how they cook if you specify it up front. getting over the first time is hard since you feel watched by everyone. I had the same. nowadays I just do it like second nature.
  • clee over 2 years ago
    I forgot to mention a suggestion. I would recommend a change in the serving sizes. Currently the servings vary quite a bit; ie., 3/4 cup hot cereal, 30g cold cereal, 1/2 cup pasta, 3/4 legumes, 3/4 tofu. I would instead suggest they round out these numbers and make them much simpler for clients to understand. Also to make the servings per meal. ie., aim for 1 cup rice at supper instead of 2- 1/2 cups to help meet needs. Or, relate the portions to the 'Handy Guide to Portions' or Eat Well Plate to help simplify it. I myself as a dietitian sometimes forget what the exact servings are, so I can imagine my clients are as well.
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    • Marjorie over 2 years ago
      I just posted about this same thing. It is very confusing to the average person about these different serving sizes. who knows what 30 g of cheese is like, oh, a dice, what a thought, do you know anyone who eats cheese that would consider that a serving size? Right not supposed to eat cheese as it is high in fat, but people are going to eat cheese, so give something realistic to gauge a serving size. On another note about educating people about eating healthy, I talk to a lot of young people, who are NOT interested in food prep, vegetables or good healthy foods. They want pizza, hamburgers, soft drinks etc. Our local high school took all these things away and implemented a nutritious food program. The kids stopped eating at the school and went to the local fast food restaurants in town. Plan defeated.
    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      funny, serving sizes with this kind of diet do not need to be set anymore. your body will adapt to this and you will have a healthy weight to boot. been there done it and feel great
  • Heatherreid over 2 years ago
    Another point in this category is information/encouragement for how to cook nutritious dishes that will, with reheating, last two to three meals. Few of us in busy households have the time/energy/planning skills to start from scratch each day to create a nutritious meal.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      nutritious does not need to be time and labour intensive. and there are these meals that can be reheated.
  • Adiah over 2 years ago
    Guiding Principle 3 -- Knowledge and skills -- requires much more specificity as many have already observed. Who will be providing that knowledge? How will it be disseminated or administered? What is the specific knowledge that this principle entails? Will the knowledge appear on the new food guide? The three recommendations mentioned as Selecting ..., Planning and preparing .... and Sharing .... seem a good starting point, but each needs much more elaboration, with examples, to be helpful to all Canadians.
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    • Wolfgang Theiss over 2 years ago
      Agree, but we got to start somewhere. Once started information can come from many places. I switched my diet over a year ago. The hardest part is talking to people and getting told that the food guide says my diet is all wrong. Canadians are a sharing bunch. once the stigma of this kind of eating is gone things will roll
  • grannyannie over 2 years ago
    generally good ideas but those who would benefit need more specific guidance such as choose a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, when possible use low fat productsfor the planning and preparing healthy meals and snacks specific ideas are neededrather than share meals ... Eating as a social activity with family and friends does *** what benefits?
  • martina over 2 years ago
    This does not explain anything. People don't know what's healthy eating or a healthy snack. Most think a piece of cheese is healthy.
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    • royale over 2 years ago
      how dare you criticize cheese?! (just kidding, i'm vegan) completely agree.
  • Madeleine Hodgson over 2 years ago
    Recommend choosing nutritious foods when shopping and also eating at home as much as possible. Avoiding all fast food meals, it's really not 'food', merely a filler! Also recommend growing your own whenever possible, without the added 'poisons' in large farm enterprises. Eat as much organic as possible.
  • Nicholestephen over 2 years ago
    I agree with this guideline 100%. I feel it is important to educate people on how to properly read nutrition labels, and more education on the food guide should be conducted in schools. My daughter has been to 3 different schools, and I was very disappointed to see that some schools promote unhealthy eating habits like eating hot dogs, ice cream, chips, pop, and bagged popcorn. These are all unhealthy food options, and should be removed from the diet.
  • janinas over 2 years ago
    Agree that education is key - particularly when presenting a shift from the 'standard North American diet'.
  • Tatyana over 2 years ago
    Yes, education is the key. We need to educate people more about nutrition. Most of people have NO IDEA about alkaline balance in a body and alkaline foods that we need to consume to balance PH level. Or food enzymes and vitamins that are being gone after cooking. Have to educate population about essential minerals and how to obtain them through the diet. About fibers and proteins (amino acids) that originally are produced by plants and " recycled " by animals. And a mechanism of constructing protein in human's body (most of people believe that proteins from food is absorbed by human body as is... have no idea that human's body breaking down proteins onto amino acids and after create it's own unique proteins for human body ).I would recommend to develop educational materials for Canadians.
  • JMP over 2 years ago
    The planning, cooking, and preparation should have a strong emphasis on plant-based foods with only necessary safety-precautions regarding meat/dairy/eggs stated. Also, expectations of the school boards' reinforcement through policy needs to be discussed/updated.
  • pambryan over 2 years ago
    It would be great to see a real investment in this education. It is sorely needed.
  • MA over 2 years ago
    I believe knowledge is key to our understanding of how to eat healthfully. Eating a whole food plant based diet is nutritionally sound. Changing our present food culture will be very challenging and no doubt this guide will be targeted by the meat and dairy industries. Education is essential because most of us are 'comfortably unaware' of the health issues from eating process foods and saturated fats. I hope this draft makes final copy.
  • baler over 2 years ago
    Point One is a very urban approach to health. Stop shopping and start filling your freezers and shelves with canned and home-grown/farmer's market food. Don't have time? I know. Who does. Make time to eat healthy. Why say 'when shopping or eating out?" This is encouraging the quick and easy approach to eating. What about growing your own food? Encourage gardening. I know, the fact is - we live in Canada and can't garden year round. Ag classes in schools could really compliment the Guide. Encourage locating your local butcher shop and getting to know what you like about a fresh ham versus a water-added ham. And yes, dairy and beef are as important as fruit and vegetables. Balance it all and make sure everyone has the opportunity to learn that. Respect all the industries that farmers represent.
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    • Jjp_44 over 2 years ago
      I agree. Shopping locally, discovering about Wild-local and whole foods can have impact on health, local ecology and grocery bills. I agree about changing the phrasing to say, "if you dine out", rather than saying "when you dine out", as many of us health conscious shoppers do not actually go to restaurants for good.
    • aileen over 2 years ago
      I could not agree, that dairy and beef are as important as fruit and vegetables. We do not need either dairy or beef to have a healthy diet, in fact they are the cause of a great deal of illness with a great amount of tax money allocated to medical.
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      • MA over 2 years ago
        I would add all meat not just beef. There is enough science out there to support your assertion.
  • c156798 over 2 years ago
    There are some countries from which I will not buy foodstuffs. I believe there are "country of origin" labelling required in Canada. Sometimes they are not followed. Also I see "processed in Canada" labels and the like. This is not acceptable to me. I want details in that case.
  • ALar56 over 2 years ago
    These are good principles. I agree with others whom have commented that growing your own food and teaching children where food comes from is equally, if not more important. I would be interested to see how each of your suggestions is elaborated on. Since cooking skills is a part of this, I would like to see more education and discussion around food start to happen in schools as well.
  • tturner over 2 years ago
    I think the new food guide will be a huge step in the right direction. I would just like to add the importance of growing your own food, when possible, and teaching children where their food comes from.
  • sauconygirl over 2 years ago
    Regarding the points listed here and on the detail page, I have the following observations. If there are multiple shoppers in a household, it may be necessary to consciously select nutritious food in one's own home. Why limit the selection behaviour to public spaces? Secondly, I would note that healthy meals need not be complex transformations. The average Canadian is likely quite capable of boiling up potatoes, corn, and broccoli or putting together a salad. I'm more likely to wonder why they are not exercising their cooking skills. Third, we naturally share meals with family/friends/co-workers although it's usually bake sales and birthday cakes. Perhaps you meant to specify the sharing of nutritious meals in particular. This emphasis was not entirely clear in your statements. Finally, I do agree that knowledge and skill is required to navigate the food environment. But I feel that this is primarily due to mixed and confusing messaging in our environments. I didn't see any statements here about food labeling but would support such a venture. I would support television and radio commercials created with the objective of educating the Canadian public regarding healthy eating patterns.
  • anitacarol over 2 years ago
    agreed but be more specific
  • Shelley over 2 years ago
    Sounds too vague!
  • wendyspring@hotmail.ca over 2 years ago
    I am vegan, and strongly support this new Food Guide.
  • Bookwhippet over 2 years ago
    I agree that saturated fats and food categories such as dairy and meat should be downgraded or excluded from a guide on healthy eating As well as being less healthy than plant based protein , meat and dairy farming is ecogically unsustainable and inhumaneFortunately phasing these foods out of the Canadian diet would make us much healthier
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    • Tonitabh over 2 years ago
      I agree with this post to increase focus on plant based protein and elimination dairy but also increased education of how to include calcium and protein in a healthy diet.
  • davef44 over 2 years ago
    The food we eat, and the air we breath, comes in the most intimate contact with our bodies of any substances or materials. It's like our bodies are inside out when it comes to the food we eat and the air we breath. So it stands to reason that we should study, and research everything we can get our hands on regarding the effect of different foods with regard to health, not only the impact on us as an individuals, but the cumulative effect by the food production systems on water, and pollution. The footprints of the industrial food system that is responsible for so much of the "food" available today is a major part of the impacting force causing climate change, and consequently affects the health of all of us.
  • Pbqc over 2 years ago
    The wrong vision is being suggested. Food choices need not be complex. Simple is always better. Eat a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, grains and seeds and drink plenty of water. Your plate should look like a rainbow. That's it. Simple food as unprocessed and close to its source as possible. Labeling of all foods and especially GMO and radiated foods must be mandatory.
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  • StephJo over 2 years ago
    Focus on whole foods, non gmo, local where possible
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    • arthursc over 2 years ago
      Plant-based whole foods are better for sure, but I don't understand the hate for GMO - can you explain?
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      • StephJo over 2 years ago
        I personally think that something that has been modified to have a cancer causing chemical sprayed on it and survive while everything else around it dies is all kinds of wrong. I personally want to know which foods are produced accordingly and be able to make my own personal choice not to put that in my body. The data on GMO is inconclusive, heavily funded by industry and very poorly conducted.
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        • Jjp_44 over 2 years ago
          The lack of longitudinal data makes the Studies too date highly inconclusive. Myself, I used to get severe gastro issues with GMO foods and I'm not the only one.
  • Elizabeth over 2 years ago
    I'm thrilled Canada's Food Plan will focus on nutrition in the form of plant-based and whole foods in general. Education is the key to change. Perhaps you can: * Describe in detail what nutritious plant-based foods are;* Show how to plan, prepare, and store healthy plant-based meals/snacks; and, * Demonstrate the benefits of sharing plant-based meals with family and friends. May I suggest you mandate simple, quick and easy plant-based and whole food preparation in schools, special care facilities, hospitals and other healthcare institutions. Teach how to be successful Vegetarians/Vegans, with an emphasis on Local, Organic, plus simple, quick and easy instructions on Prep. The population has been on auto-pilot and hurting their health with prepackaged processed creations of mostly starch, fat, sugar and salt. Perhaps when hospitals, schools, and other institutions serve only healthy/tasty preparations of fresh colourful vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts and seeds, then the population will start to get back-on-track. Much of my youth was spent on a fruit and vegetable farm enjoying local, nutritious, and fresh produce. However, most people are removed from the family farm culture and limited to factory farm food which is horrific for animals, disastrous for the environment, and a sad statement of society today. I'm surprized when my clients don't know how to select and prepare healthy vegetable, fruit and legume dishes. They don't know HOW to be Vegan and think meat is the only protein! May I suggest you break the myths about protein in public announcements on television, supported by instructions on how to be Vegetarian or Vegan and how to support Local and Organic Farmers.My clients rely too heavily on pre-packaged convenience foods and fast-foods so their mood, fitness level, and health suffers greatly. Clients are grateful when they realize how easy it is to be Vegan, they drop excess weight, their health improves, and they feel fantastic. Thank you for changing the Canada Food Guide to emphasize plant-based foods! It's revolutionary and will positively impact Canada's future!
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    • Jjp_44 over 2 years ago
      Yes please!
  • TroyDettwiler over 2 years ago
    Great simple guideline. I hope that more resources can be developed around this framework. It might be worth talking about people's relationship with food in the last point (eating in front of a device versus eating with friends and family).
  • Diane Beckett over 2 years ago
    This is good, but be sure to also focus on the unhealthy food system which makes it very difficult to eat healthy. Ensure that the advice does not imply that its just an individual decision to eat healthy and that health Canada will move forward to ensure the food system provides more healthy alternatives. I try to eat a whole food, plant based diet with no added oils or sugars. That's easy at home, but when I go out even vegan food is high in fat, often with coconut oil which is saturated fat.
  • John McEwen over 2 years ago
    My wife and I are completely in favour of this new recommendation as written. Please do not change it due to pressure from industry.
  • PauletteG over 2 years ago
    THe above are good general statements. The issue is that over time many people have lost the knowledge of food preparation as convenience/fun overcame nutrition as the main focus of meal preparation. Health Canada should seek out & provide links to organisations that provide nutrition information based on world wide nutrition research (ie: nutritionfacts.org) and recipes, preparation guidelines etc for plant based cooking (ie: pulses.org/nap/) These kinds of fact based (nutrition science) and preparation based (how to make delicious plant based dishes) helps Canadians follow the recommendations through practical information.
  • Fred over 2 years ago
    Agree
  • Sandra over 2 years ago
    I think this is fantastic and hope it passes. For the sake of our children!!!
  • arthursc over 2 years ago
    Labeling foods which are unhealthy is extremely important. Most people have insufficient time to perform adequate research on the foods they're using and need help to determine which are healthiest for them. This includes labeling on meat products (especially processed), dairy products, and eggs to indicate dangers of cardiovascular disease, labeling high sugar foods for diabetes concerns, high salt foods for cardiovascular disease, and high saturated fat foods. It would also be beneficial to include labeling on whole, plant-based foods to indicate that they are healthy.
  • Karen Lee Edwards over 2 years ago
    learning about what is nutritional food, about planning and preparing meals are necessary life skills many Canadians are lacking. Developing an 'app' that can guide and teach people about the complexities of making healthy choices would be great. It can be done in a simple and dignified manner. It is not just the poor who lack these skills. Just this past week I'm met a woman who grew up in a remote maritime province. It the food was not caught it came in a can. This newly retired woman is now learning about what is nutritious food and how to prepare it. She is 65. We cannot assume because we know what healthy food is that everyone does, as well. If people are to make healthy choices they need to know what those choices are, honestly. The food industry has done a magnificent job always improving their bottom line under the guise of 'healthy' foods. They have managed to manipulate the majority with their untrue marketing. Perhaps, an app that teaches about what marketing does and how it effects our choices would be great!
  • Manuela over 2 years ago
    Make sure your fruits and vegetables are all the colors of the rainbow. Stick to ancient grains if you can. Avocado is a nice healthy fat. Read labels and learn to spot trouble items glucose fructose as an example. So many names for sugar. Fresh as possible for fruit and veg. though frozen is better than not eating enough fruit and veg. It is more time consuming in the beginning reading all the labels but once you have your core items, you can just buy them and go.
  • scouteroo over 2 years ago
    "Selecting nutritious foods when shopping or eating out" This is a very obvious goal but hard to do for many families. How does one tell what's a nutritious food choice? Do people have time to read all the ingredients, nutrition facts, etc. for each product at the grocery store? How do people make an educated choice when some information is not disclosed or may lead to the wrong conclusion? (Example: No GMO labelling, Sugar DV too high). I think the recommendation should be for people to try to buy: fruits and vegetables, nuts, healthy fats (like coconut oil/olive oil), legumes and other plant-based foods while avoiding meats/dairy, non-organic wheat, sugary and processed foods.
  • Margo.Riebe-Butt over 2 years ago
    Can we call this what it is? Food Literacy? There are several great working definitions of same to be drawn from. Perhaps not a mainstream term right now, but if it's in the CFG it will be-and this is needed. I like where this principle is going, but it needs some good massaging. Developing knowledge and skills will be key in order for people to be able to follow this revised food guide if we're looking for a return to more whole foods and a decrease in processed/prepared foods.
  • susaallc over 2 years ago
    I think that this generation of fast paced lifestyles with high percentages of single parent, double income earners, kids involved in after school activities etc has created a generation of processed food junkies as a means of survival in a time of extreme time restraints. I think we need to create a new generation that is knowledgeable and capable of creating quick healthy meals for their families by educating our youth in schools. This would include mandatory education and training for all students in a middle/high school foods course not as a option class.
  • oldgal over 2 years ago
    This comment is under review.
  • Is67147 over 2 years ago
    There is so little time to plan and prepare meals because it was decided that both parents needed to be working to support a family, that the value of having one parent at home to raise the kids, manage the finances, do the shopping, meal prep, housecleaning, volunteering at schools and other areas was not worthy of status, minimum living wage, or tax credit. Now we rush to daycares and then work and then daycares and home with no time to live a healthy lifestyle. When we can slow down we can start to pay attention. When we are willing to "pay" the chef at home as much as the chef in a restaurant - then we can truely respect the importance of these decisions.
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    • AnnPedersen over 2 years ago
      As a society, we also need to recognize the intrinsic value of the chef-at-home, the teacher-at-home, the volunteer-at-home, the counsellor-at-home, etc. If the stay home support person were paid for all the roles they perform, we would all be paying a good deal more than we pay now . . . and probably should be.
    • oldgal over 2 years ago
      This is part of the "hate the working parents" value system. We were full time employees who also managed to spend lots of time with our children and instil great values. We also prepared fresh home-made meals and ate together most days. We did it all and were successful in both home and careers. We were fortunate to be well-educated and healthy and I recognize that not everyone can do it. But don't disparage working mothers! Do what works for you but don't justify your choice by crapping on someone else!
  • JDavey over 2 years ago
    I agree with Ashleigh; this guiding principle is much too vague. Will this guiding principle come with more direction? If someone is having difficulty with eating healthy, it could be that they may not really know how/or where to start.The ideas to incorporate the idea of "shopping the outside aisles (fresh fruits and vegetables, deli, meats, bakery, dairy, eggs, frozen fruits and vegetables, etc.) And seriously, this move to a more healthier lifestyle should be reflected in the grocery stores too...we need to raise our voice over the wrong message being sent with the plethora of high in sugar/ candy/ junk mail available at the grocery checkout aisles. For the ideas of planning and preparing healthy meals and snacks, will this again come with more direction? If this new and improved food guide could come with more direction and/or where to find those bits of information. This will not only help for a healthier approach to food planning, cooking, and preparation; but also, this move will help to reduce food waste by showing how leftovers can be planned into future lunches and dinners.I LOVE the idea of supporting the sharing meals with family and friends, this should be followed up with why! Less on the go/eating on the run while driving to another night out/etc. Moving back to the sit down or sharing approach can be a great reminder of how eating together in itself can promote a better eating routine, support from others to eat well, allowing foods to digest properly, etc. I would love these ideas to really be expanded upon to help keep a healthy approach to food!
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    • antonia over 2 years ago
      I agree that these principles are vague but I also think that "shopping the outside aisles" does not give people a very useful guide of what to buy. For instance in the bakery section there are lots of white breads, cookies and muffins and in the middles aisles there are lots of good foods such as rolled oats in the cereal section, dried and canned beans, rice, and nuts and seeds in the bulk section. On your note on grocery store lay out, you might be pleased to hear that the Canadian Super Store in North Vancouver have changed their layout so right when you walk in you are presented with the vegetable and fruit section.
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      • JDavey over 2 years ago
        Good points! The shopping of the outside aisles would definitely need to be better explained, but it is one of those concepts that could get my point across. Agreed about the nutritional items in the middle aisles, there are things that we venture in for (and I also understand that different stores have different set-ups, so that would need to be thought about as well.). Example: dried fruit, nuts, rolled oats, etc. can be found in our outside aisles.
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        • Is67147 over 2 years ago
          And shopping local would help. Only buy what's in season during our summer and then try buying from other places. We didn't evolve to eat pineapples 365 days a year!
    • Is67147 over 2 years ago
      And can u imagine what kids might learn if they were given time to sit down at school and eat without the pressure to hurry up and get outside. Healthy choices start w parents teaching kids and schools supporting those choices. Why do we do fundraising for a new playground by selling candy to kids and families?
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      • antonia over 2 years ago
        Not to mention bbqs are often put on as fundraisers for causes such as cancer research when hot dogs themselves are known to be carcinogenic. I think a lot of our social norms that involve food will need a rethink.
  • Dale Williams over 2 years ago
    Great ideas!